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BATMAN DARK KNIGHT COMIC BOOK

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As a part of the acclaimed DC Comics - The New 52 event of September , the Dark Knight continues his crusade as defender of Gotham City, taking on his . 1 - Knight Terrors (The New 52) (Batman The Dark Knight: The New 52) David Finch began his comic book career at the age of 22 at Top Cow. There, he. "In four groundbreaking issues in late , Miller's DARK KNIGHT RETURNS delighted and enraged comic book classicists by turning Batman--a beloved but.


Batman Dark Knight Comic Book

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Batman: The Dark Knight was an American comic book ongoing series, written and penciled by David Finch and featuring Batman. One of two new ongoing titles. The Dark Knight Returns is a four-issue comic book miniseries starring Batman, written by Frank Miller, illustrated by Miller. Batman: The Dark Knight is a comic book series starring Batman. The series is spun out of the events of the return of Bruce Wayne and The Road Home.

The original series launched in as the third major monthly Batman title, following the popularity of Tim Burton's Batman film. Many of the stories follow the tone of Frank Miller's Batman: Year One. The series differs from other Batman titles of the time. The creative team rotated with every story arc and the stories stood alone, unlike the inter-connected nature of other Batman comics. Initially the title ran stories contained to five issues, often with more mature topics and sensibilities than the other Batman titles.

Garth Ennis despises the concept of super-heroes, yet he has penned some fantastic super-epics. When someone reviewing your work uses descriptive phrases like "Prequel Era George Lucas" to describe your writing and you'd better believe I WILL be in this review , you suck worse than a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy and need to seriously reconsider writing comic books as a viable career option.

Let's take a closer look at this disaster Beginning a story with an inmate escape at Arkham Asylum has been done to death so many times even Nightwing has made a running joke about Arkham's "revolving door" policy.

Oh, but this time the Batman villains are displaying powers and abilities beyond the norm what's "norm" for them, anyway and are acting without the typical fear they possess for Batman.

While a novel concept at first, the idea quickly grows tiresome. The most effective uses of the "inmates escaping Arkham" concept I've seen were in the "Knightfall" saga essentially, Bane was Batman's version of Doomsday and in the epic "No Man's Land" tale.

In "Knightfall", Batman had already been running in high stress mode for some time and his health was slowly deteriorating with every villain he fought. Seeking to conquer Gotham's Dark Knight and claim the city as his own, Bane released numerous inmates from Arkham in order to weaken Batman further until Wayne was ready to drop from sheer mental and physical exhaustion before Bane finally confronted him at Wayne Manner as Bane had somehow already deduced Batman's secret identity.

Several issues focused on Batman trying to round up all the Arkham escapees while being stalked by the muscle-bound madman in a luchador mask. In "No Man's Land", a massive earthquake hits Gotham which had already been hit pretty hard by a highly infectious pathogen designed by Ra's al Ghul. Arkham Asylum was relatively untouched, its recently-upgraded security measures keeping its inmates confined to the Asylum complex.

However, as Gotham City proper deteriorated and city services water, electricity, emergency medical services, et all shut down in the wake of the disaster, the inmates at Arkham faced starvation.

Batman: The Dark Knight Returns

Rather than think of the safety of Gothamites first, bleeding heart senior psychiatrist Dr. Jeremiah Arkham released the inmates to allow them the chance to survive in the ruins of Gotham rather than starve inside the asylum. Naturally, the inmates flooded Gotham's streets, and the worst of the inmates carved large swaths of the city apart in brutal gang wars. Sadly, this story has none of the brutal, well-plotted panache of "Knightfall" or "No Man's Land", and the inmate escape - even with the inmates acting like muscle-pumped jocks on a 'roid rage - rarely seems like more than a minor inconvenience to Batman.

Bring out the Bat-tasers. Beatings for everyone! Reading this comic was less a literary experience and more like a really bad drug trip, minus the fun of actually being on drugs. God, now I'm having flashbacks to "The Matrix Reloaded". Quit making me think of bad movies, comic book! Now, I'm a happily heterosexual male and I enjoy depictions of the female form as much as the next heterosexual male, but DC Comics villainesses in the Batman family seem to be wearing less and less clothing lately.

Less clothing does NOT make a villainess sexy; their attitude, the way they are written, makes them sexy. The artwork either enhances or detracts from that. Moreover, Batman villainesses have displayed various types of "sexy" over the years, from the bizarre Poison Ivy has made many a male want to go vegan to the fetishistic Catwoman was a dominatrix in Frank Miller's "Year One", hence her characteristic cat-o-nine-tails whip and the downright frightening Harley Quinn - sweet, girly, cutesy, demure Harley - is totally devoted to a sadistic, psychopathic killer clown who carves smiles into his victim's corpses, poisons people with lethal overdoses of laughing gas, and once beat a teenage boy - Robin 2, Jason Todd - nearly to death with a crowbar before leaving him in a warehouse with a timebomb.

Nevertheless, the Batman villainesses have managed to be sexy without having to resort to wearing naught but lingerie. Poison Ivy: All the skintight clothing makes sense in a combat situation: That seems to have changed with "The New 52". While Power Girl has gone refreshingly conservative with her wardrobe and closed the silly cleavage hole her past costumes have possessed, the Batman villainesses are tarting it up, wearing less and less.

In the new Suicide Squad, Harley Quinn 2. Her personality is totally gone, replaced by a generic "bad girl" 'tude and the sort of clothing one might find in a fetish shop. This new villainess is no exception. What's her costume? White lingerie.

Bunny ears. An eye-covering mask. A rabbit tail. That's it. She's a Playboy bunny who fled from Hefner's palatial manse probably next door to Bruce's; where do you think Wayne finds all his dates?

No real air of menace. A little bit of "Who IS she? If all I wanted from a female comics character was lots of cheesecake, I'd watch porn instead. Give me characters with real personality or stop writing!

Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight - Wikipedia

Granted, the "Who Done It? At one point, Batman asks Alfred to scour the Internet for information on the White Rabbit and gives Alfred her description: Unless he's about to beat someone senseless for not telling him where the Joker is before he can prevent a bomb from filling City Hall with laughing gas, that is.

But that's it! Batman doesn't smile! And since when did genteel, kindly Alfred make jokes about looking at photos of scantily-clad ladies on the Internet? Granted, Alfred has always had a biting sense of sarcasm, but he's always been a classy, highly professional British butler.

This joke seems out of character even for Michael Cane's rough-and-tumble version of Alfred. Sam Quixote noted Commissioner Gordon's very out-of-character phone calls to Bruce pleading for Batman to come out and play. As he noted, British comic writer Paul Jenkins is to blame. Jenkins worked primarily for Marvel, where he drew critical acclaim for his work on Peter Parker: Spider-Man and Spectacular Spider-Man.

That's his main problem: The characterizations and dialogue in this book would work well in one of the Spider-Man books; in a Batman series it all feels very off kilter. Remember how flat and dull the characters in the Star Wars prequels were compared to how vibrant and lively the characters in the original Star Wars trilogy were?

That's the difference. In Snyder's and Capullo's seminal Batman series, the characters feel like the Batman, Alfred, Nightwing, et all that we all know and love. In this series, it feels like we're reading some strange alternate universe Batman.

The difference is as glaring as the difference between George Lucas' early work with the original Star Wars trilogy and his later work with the prequels, and when it comes to dialogue "Batman: The Dark Knight" is just as bad as the prequels were. Ultimately, the story revolves around a novel concept: As former Marvel editor-in-chief Tom DeFalco once said, "A good idea does not a story make," and that adage rings true here. The concept is solid, but it needed much more coaxing to make it work, much less cliche, and the writers needed to familiarize themselves with the characters more in order to make their dialogue and actions more believable.

The Dark Knight - this book is definitely the weakest link. If you can only afford one Batman comic per month, skip this one and read Snyder's and Capullo's subtitle-less "Batman" monthly series instead. Apr 29, Robjr73 rated it it was amazing Shelves: Look, I admit it. I'm 45 and still love reading comics and graphic novels. These days it seems like the majority of the world has some kind of interest in superheroes and why not?

It's fun. Batman has always been up there as one of my all time favorite superheroes.

And if you're looking for a collection of Batman comics that pretty much captures what classic Batman storytelling is all about then you need to read this. I absolutely loved it. This collection is based off of a Batman series that fo Look, I admit it. This collection is based off of a Batman series that for some reason only lasted 29 issues.

Maybe there were too many other Batman titles at the time but I'm surprised this didn't survive the whole New 52 thing. Anyways, this book has it all.

Of course it starts with a whole bunch of baddies escaping Arkham and yeah if you're a Batman fan you've seen that happen in the comics at least a hundred times but who cares I loved it. The art is fantastic with many full page spreads. There's some drama with commissioner Gordon, there's a mysterious female love interest for Bruce Highly recommended! Nov 02, Sesana rated it it was ok Shelves: Not a fan. The book opens with Batman doing an extended internal monologue about the nature of fear that is really poorly written.

In fact, most of the dialog and internal monologue is bad. The overarching storyline Rogues escaping Arkham! Modified fear toxin! Bane trying to kill Batman for no real reason! And then there's the new White Rabbit character, who exists only for stupidly gratuitous fanservice.

The art is a nightmare of 90s vein-and-bulding- Not a fan. The art is a nightmare of 90s vein-and-bulding-muscle artwork that I despised back then. The only true bright spot is Alfred, who spends his every scene being awesome. Jun 12, Christopher rated it liked it Shelves: I seem to be reading a good number of comics lately that are just ok.

Add another one to the list. Beyond asking wtf is going on with White Rabbit's lack of a costume, I'll just point you over to Anne and Sam's reviews. They gave it the same 'meh' 3 stars that I did, but they actually felt up to typing out why.

View all 3 comments. Which still doesn't make it so good. Hulked out inmates escape from Arkham, under the influence of a toxin that make them know no fear. This part is rather quickly done with, the point being to find the creator of the toxin. The plot isn't too subtle and drags on a bit too long, one false lead after another until the revelation of the culprit.

This time Finch didn't disperse himself with too many subplots- good idea- but still goes heavy in portraying Forbes as a first class mofo-not so good. I don't see why he's on to Gordon so much. Did he rape his dog or something? There seems to be something at play here but either it spreads in other bat-titles or it's simply awkward. Gordon also seems a bit too much weepy to be true. There's a Playboy Bunny running around and for the love of me I can't find any reason to her presence but to show some ass.

I'm past fantasizing over comic book character so it actually bored me more than anything else. Her link to someone else is pretty obvious and shows once again a lack of subtlety.

Artwise it's some good Finch- the Arkham inmates are really creepy and the babes gorgeous- with a touch of fumbles. Some compositions are as awkward as some proportions but it can easily be overcome. One was notably ridiculous though: Anyone running so leaned forward would just simply fall flat on the ground. It's called the law of gravity.

Nov 28, Peter Derk rated it liked it. There's a good and a bad to this. The good is that at least Batman was punching people in this one. There was a good amount of action, which some of the other new Batman titles are lacking sorely. The bad is that the overall story was pretty, well, business as usual.

Bane tried to kill Batman. Someone made a weird Scarecrow formula. The best parts in this book were the Alfred bits. I'm serious. There were a couple sections where Alfred was actually funny instead of acting like Batman's mom and su There's a good and a bad to this. There were a couple sections where Alfred was actually funny instead of acting like Batman's mom and suggesting he stop fighting crime for the upteenth time.

There's even a part where Alfred hands Batman an ice cream cone. I'm not sure why exactly, but regardless, seeing Batman hold an ice cream cone is one of the bigger thrills of my recent life. I DO feel obligated to inform you at this point that my life is an endless labyrinth of darkness and shame from which there will be no escaping.

Feb 14, Gavin rated it really liked it Shelves: I very much enjoyed 'The Dark Knight' series as it was launched as part of the 52 initiative. This Batman is drawn very well, a ripped, ass-kicker, who's still quite the detective, but just manages to seem a wee bit more intimidating. Not too shabby at all, and I really enjoy his interactions with Flash and Superman especially.

In this volume, Alfred has a bit more sense of I very much enjoyed 'The Dark Knight' series as it was launched as part of the 52 initiative. In this volume, Alfred has a bit more sense of humour than in other versions, which is a nice change of pace. I look forward to following this even more, as I still don't think there's a thing as too many Batman titles.

May 05, Aaron rated it it was ok. Well this is a big sloppy pile of nonsense. I find it pretty hard to believe Paul Jenkins did all of the writing on this terribly-plotted straight-line of fight scenes and deux ex machinae.

And hey, he does that well. His designs for juiced-up, freaked-out versions of pretty much every villain Batman has ever fought are the exact right amount of distur Well this is a big sloppy pile of nonsense. His designs for juiced-up, freaked-out versions of pretty much every villain Batman has ever fought are the exact right amount of disturbing, and the detail he adds to scenes is just a couple levels down from Michael Turner which is high praise. But that can't save this story from feeling like a boring parade of villains, none of which have any real goals or stakes attached.

There's nothing in here that feels like a twist or a revelation. Things just kind of progress, with new villains suddenly showing up out of absolutely nowhere. They will literally just jump into a fight from off screen. Same goes for heroes like The Flash and Superman, who make appearances here that do nothing to service the plot. They're seemingly just around so Finch can draw them.

In fact, we don't even see any real consequences for anything that happens in this book. It's just a bunch of fighting and yelling.

Oh, and we can't forget Bodacious Babes. There are two women in this book, both of which were fabricated for this story, and they're both drawn from the Maliest Male perspective this side of a s Playboy.

One of them, a woman who is legit dressed like a sexy bunny, is in full-on lingerie everywhere she goes. Just, out and about, scheming up schemes in her corset and nothing else.

I thought for sure we'd moved past this kind of junk by now, but I guess not. In any case, I'm glad to see Gregg Hurwitz takes over with the next volume.

Hopefully a new, seasoned writer taking over will mean stronger stories to go with the great art. I'll give it a shot for that reason, but if it's anything like this, I'm not excited.

Dec 30, Evan Leach rated it liked it Shelves: Knight Terrors is probably my second favorite of the four debut volumes i.

The gist of the plot is that, believe it or not, the top-notch security at Arkham Asylum has been breached once again and a breakout has occurred. This latest prison break involves some strange drugs and a mysterious, scantily clad woman.

There are some twists and turns which I will not spoil because I am a gentleman. But overall this felt fairly generic plot-wise: I was entertained, but I did not find the story to be particularly gripping or memorable. With four bat-titles clogging the New 52 release calendar, I was curious to see how this series would set itself apart from the others.

At least in the early going, the answer seems to be with a lot of cameos from the wider DC universe. In this book alone, the following heroes appear on the scene: A pleasant read, but just OK. Apr 30, Nessie McInness rated it it was ok Shelves: What did I think, Goodreads?!

I'm a really big Batman fan. Batman Beyond was what got me into DC comics as a young teenager and ever since I've grown with DC, Flash and Green Lantern became my favourites, but Batman will always have a special place in my heart. I have never read such a dreadful Batman series.

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The only good thing about this was a cheeky Alfred, who isn't the sober character he usuall What did I think, Goodreads?! The only good thing about this was a cheeky Alfred, who isn't the sober character he usually plays. It's a mix of gratuitous boobage and bum and overly ripped characters that made me embarrassed to read it in public. Seriously, I got some major looks from the old lady sitting next to me in the train.

If you're a horny teenage boy, looking for a brainless story, full of boobies and gory punches If on the contrary you were expecting this to be an entertaining action full interesting Batman story, don't bother.

Read Scott Snyder's run. Or some of the good oldies. This seriously makes me think that sometimes people on the comic book industry just don't want women to read comics. Or grown ups to read up, for that matter. Dec 08, Emmett Spain rated it really liked it. Focusing on the more macabre elements in the life of Gotham's guardian, the Dark Knight is a bloody journey through themes of fear, pain, and control.

It's also filled with dozens of Bat-villains, with appearances from Joker, Two-Face, Poison Ivy, and a whole host of others , ranging to some lesser known crims like Tweedledee and Tweedledum and the Ventriloquist who are ridiculous, but unsettling. Overall it's well weighted and beautifully drawn, with negative points only being awarded to the Focusing on the more macabre elements in the life of Gotham's guardian, the Dark Knight is a bloody journey through themes of fear, pain, and control.

Overall it's well weighted and beautifully drawn, with negative points only being awarded to the porn-bait character of the White Rabbit, who is basically a morally-ambiguous Playboy bunny in full bunny regalia, including panties so small and revealing that it's a wonder why she bothered wearing them at all. But that horny-old-man impulse to include porno characters aside, this really is a fun, dark journey into the depths of Batman's world. Parents, don't get it for you kids unless they're 14 and over.

Jan 10, Quentin Wallace rated it really liked it. This was one of the better of the New 52 Batman titles. I always liked Dave Finch's art, and you can see his love of the Batman character here. There's also some really sexy art as well White Rabbit, Rawr.

Nice costume there. The storyline is also pretty cool as several heroes and villains put in appearances. Some people may think the story was a lit This was one of the better of the New 52 Batman titles. Some people may think the story was a little overdone and more sizzle than steak, but overall I found it entertaining.

It also has a darker tone then the other Batman books, probably due to Finch'a art more than anything else. Paul Jenkins is also an important collaborator, as the writing did seem a notch higher than Finch writing on his own.

Overall if you're a Batman fan I'd recommend this one.

Aug 27, Jesse A rated it really liked it Shelves: This one took a bit to get going but once it found its stride it got pretty good. Feb 03, Jerry rated it liked it. One of the most popular superheroes of all time, Batman has stood out as the most gritty and serious do-gooder in DC's roster. Even the Warner Bros.

BATMAN: THE DARK KNIGHT #1

Though the artwork was fabulous and the story left me hungry for the next volume, a smattering of profanities and an excess of blood, along with some rather scary villains and some scantily clad female characters, made this a shock to my Disney Chan One of the most popular superheroes of all time, Batman has stood out as the most gritty and serious do-gooder in DC's roster.

Though the artwork was fabulous and the story left me hungry for the next volume, a smattering of profanities and an excess of blood, along with some rather scary villains and some scantily clad female characters, made this a shock to my Disney Channel sensibilities. If you don't mind such content, you may enjoy this better than I did; it was still fun for what it was, though. Sep 02, Kyle rated it really liked it Shelves: I really enjoyed this one. It is a typical Batman comic, it has some nice artwork, it lightly waxes philosophic on some dark themes, there's lots of action.

I loved the cameos from certain Justice League members and bat-family members. Plus, there is a panoply of my favourite villains in this volume Bruce Wayne resumes his duty as Batman and founds Batman Incorporated. During the series' publication, the Batman comic books were divided between Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson.

Both characters were operating under the costumed identity of the Batman. The Dark Knight focuses on Bruce who, despite busy with Batman Incorporated, still cannot completely separate himself from Gotham City as he still has ties, grudges and relationships there.

The Demon co-stars in the this series. The first issue was the best selling comic for the month of December However, production delays plagued the series resulting in only five issues being produced. The series is ended and relaunched with a second volume as part of DC Comics' company wide relaunch on September Back to Comics Contents: Comics B: The Dark Knight Vol 1.

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