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KAMASUTRA STORY BOOK

Wednesday, September 4, 2019


The Kama Sutra is an ancient Indian Sanskrit text on sexuality, eroticism and emotional .. Book 3 of the Kamasutra is largely dedicated to the art of courtship with the aim of marriage. The book's opening verse declares marriage to be a. Yet the book began its long life in third-century India as something quite The first work to tell the full story of the "Kamasutra," "The Book of. The first work to tell the full story of the Kamasutra, The Book of Love explores how a way of looking at the world came to be cradled between book covers-and.


Kamasutra Story Book

Author:MARIETTA MCNEFF
Language:English, Spanish, Japanese
Country:Liechtenstein
Genre:Science & Research
Pages:119
Published (Last):11.05.2016
ISBN:291-4-33411-367-9
ePub File Size:22.44 MB
PDF File Size:16.26 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:33499
Uploaded by: JARED

The Book of Love book. Read 7 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. An engaging, enlightening “biography†of the ancient Hindu m. An “enticing elegant and stylish” biography of the ancient Hindu manuscript that became the world's most famous sex manual (The New York Review of. Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Tracing the celebrated sex manual from its palm-leaf manuscript origins in third-century India to contemporary.

View Larger Image. Ask Seller a Question. The book of love: New York: Metropolitan Books. Dust Jacket Condition: Dust Jacket Included.

There was no shame in turning to paid sex. This last and highest kind of prostitute is the ganika, a woman of significant independence and high status — the ganikas of the fifth-century Licchavi kingdom of Nepal even had their own political representative body and were considered one of the glories of the city.

Confusingly, these are not the sixty-four kama-kalas that mark out the properly trained nagaraka, but the sixty-four silpa-kalas, a finishing-school-type programme of feminine accomplishments ranging from cooking and testing gold and silver, to making glasses sing by rubbing their wet rims, and teaching parrots and mynah birds to talk. Massage and hairdressing, meanwhile, more obviously lend themselves to the young student of kama, as do the arts of putting on make-up — including make-up for the teeth — and dressing a bed properly.

In truth, the Kamasutra is no more isolated from its context than the real nagaraka can have been insulated from the everyday demands of religion, work and family. Vatsyayana was not just composing a manual for the men-about-town of his day, nor was he simply describing their world.

It was something far more ambitious and profound. Sacred or not, this text was clearly unwieldy, so a sage by the name of Svetaketu Auddalaki cut it down to a more memorable chapters. Perhaps this was still unmanageable, for another erotic expert called Babhravya, from the western Pancala country, further edited the book down to a mere chapters.

The grandfathers of the Kamasutra appear in other texts as well, albeit as sexual lawmakers rather than experts in technique.

The Book of Love: The Story of the Kamasutra

Svetaketu appears in the already ancient mythological epic, the Mahabharata, as a legendary seer from the distant past. He is first mentioned when Pandu, the king of the Kurus, explains to his wife Kunti that women used to be free and sexually autonomous.

That very usage is followed to this day by birds and beasts without any jealousy. Pandu gets his come-uppance when he shoots a deer with an arrow while it is trying to mate.

The deer turns out to a disguised sage taking advantage of the relatively relaxed rules on animal sexuality, who curses Pandu, saying that if he attempts to have sex with either of his two wives he will surely die.

Heroically, Pandu tries to have sex with his second wife, Madri — and dies. Svetaketu again figures as a patriarch of sexual regulation in the philosophical Brihadaranyaka Upanishad, which probably dates back to the sixth or seventh centuries BC. Asking his father for an explanation of the meaning and mystery of sex, he is told that sex is a kind of sacrificial offering of man to the gods by means of woman.

It even involves the traditional ritual ingredients of kusha grass and the mysterious Soma an ingredient which has been variously identified as the hallucinogenic fly agaric mushroom and the stimulant desert plant ephedra.

Babhravya, however, the other grandfather of the erotic tradition, feels less distant. In doing so, he nearly killed off kama. Like the ancient works of Babhravya and Svetaketu, the seven works of the seven original sexual specialists are now lost. Only a few mere fragments or quotations survive — but enough to be sure that they existed in the distant past.

In his opening chapter, Vatsyayana announced that the teaching on kama had become dangerously fragmented and he was mounting an urgent rescue mission. He set out to pick up the threads of an ancient and perhaps moribund tradition in order to bind them together. He wanted the Kamasutra to be quoted and referred to by future generations.

In the third century, however, books were a rare novelty. Manuscripts existed in the form of dried palm leaves inscribed with a stylus whose pinhead-fine scratch marks were afterwards inked in, and there was even paper to be found, made from the skin of birch trees. But most texts were probably learned by rote rather than written down. There was only one way to ensure that the Kamasutra was remembered and that was to make it literally memorable.

Vatsyayana accordingly composed in the tightly woven sutra form. A celebrated Sanskrit sutra, in the classic two-line form, defines the nature of a good sutra: There were drawbacks, however. Vatsyayana was so concerned that his Kamasutra should survive that he made it concise to the point of being cryptic. This compressed style would cause serious problems for future translators. By the time he reached concluding verses of the Kamasutra, Vatsyayana was clearly exhausted.

Three of the seven books do not sit easily with the other four.

The final book, on aphrodisiacs, meanwhile, is blatantly tacked on at the end. Like Homer, he may have been a convenient name for unknown compositors, a figure dreamed up to confer a greater degree of unity on a text that was cobbled together from disparate sources. The idea was not so much to advance or redefine thinking on the subject of kama, but to capture the best thinking from existing schools of thought.

The Kamasutra was intended to be a contribution to the great scientific project of the era: As Vatsyayana describes it, the teaching of Babhravya, Svetaketu and the other venerable authorities formed a shastra, or a learned teaching on a particular topic. And at around the time he composed the Kamasutra, new shastras were constantly being created.

The Book of Love

Patanjali had composed his Mahabhasya, a definitive commentary on the ancient science of grammar, not long before. Bharata contributed his Natyashastra, which examined every conceivable aspect of the teaching and performance of dance and theatre. Collectively, these shastras could be seen as a vast encyclopedia striving to present the best wisdom available on all subjects — which, in the Brahminical world-view, meant divine wisdom.

It was to be the last word on the subject. But what that subject actually was — what kama really meant — was deeply controversial. The Viennese Sanskritist, Chlodwig Werba, has a more radical suggestion, however.

Kama, then, is an experience that appears to relate on some level to orgasm, not conception, and this kind of orgasm appears to have been seen as a microcosm of the enlightened liberation of the soul. The difference in translation is the result of no mere academic spat; it echoes the single most debated point in the entire realm of sexuality: If Chlodwig Werba is right, the Kamasutra is unequivocally on the side of pleasure. In Hinduism, kama was — and still is — ranked as one of the three fundamental goals of human existence, which together formed the trivarga, or triple path.

The three goals were dharma, artha and kama. The terms are famously hard to translate. Fortunately, the Kamasutra includes the pithiest definition found in any Hindu text. It is the trivarga, rather than kama alone, that Vatsyayana declares to be the subject of his text. He even opens his book by saluting the trio. Together, they define and underpin all knowledge, all virtue and, ultimately, all human life.

It would address one of the three fundamental areas of human experience: It could fill the space beyond dharma and artha, concerning itself with all things physical and social.

As such, a book on the subject could discuss not just lovemaking but the entire life of the gentleman nagaraka in all his private capacities: Vatsyayana had another reason to emphasize sex as a life-goal: Many of his fellow Brahmin scholars would have had little time for the distractions of kama — and still less for a text glorifying the philanderings of nagarakas under the banner of philosophy.

By contrast, study of dharma and artha, the other life-goals of the trivarga, was flourishing. Authoritative works on dharma and artha had already become standards by the time the Kamasutra was born.

It also tried to regulate sexual behaviour. Its ideal is that sex should be strictly procreative and monogamous: The penalties for adultery are severe: Description An engaging, enlightening "biography" of the ancient Hindu manuscript that became the world's most famous sex manual The "Kamasutra "is one of the world's best-known yet least-understood texts, its title instantly familiar but its actual contents widely misconstrued.

In the popular imagination, it is a work of practical pornography, a how-to guide of absurdly acrobatic sexual techniques. Yet the book began its long life in third-century India as something quite different: Over the ensuing centuries, the "Kamasutra "was first celebrated, then neglected, and very nearly lost--until an outrageous adventurer introduced it to the West and earned literary immortality.

In lively and lucid prose, James McConnachie provides a rare, intimate look at the exquisite civilization that produced this cultural cornerstone.

The Book of Love: The Story of the Kamasutra (Hardcover) | Poor Richard's Books

He details the quest of famed explorer Richard F. Burton, who--along with his clandestine coterie of libertines and iconoclasts--unleashed the "Kamasutra "on English society as a deliberate slap at Victorian prudishness and paternalism.

And he describes how the "Kamasutra "was driven underground into the hands of pirate pornographers, until the end of the "Lady Chatterley "obscenity ban thrust it once more into contentious daylight. Yet the book began its long life in third-century India as something quite different: Over the ensuing centuries, the Kamasutra was first celebrated, then neglected, and very nearly lost—until an outrageous adventurer introduced it to the West and earned literary immortality.

In lively and lucid prose, James McConnachie provides a rare, intimate look at the exquisite civilization that produced this cultural cornerstone.

He details the quest of famed explorer Richard F. Burton, who—along with his clandestine coterie of libertines and iconoclasts—unleashed the Kamasutra on English society as a deliberate slap at Victorian prudishness and paternalism.

And he describes how the Kamasutra was driven underground into the hands of pirate pornographers, until the end of the Lady Chatterley obscenity ban thrust it once more into contentious daylight. The first work to tell the full story of the Kamasutra , The Book of Love explores how a remarkable way of looking at the world c… More….

The first work to tell the full story of the Kamasutra , The Book of Love explores how a remarkable way of looking at the world came to be cradled between book covers—and survived.

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