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LIVRO O ALQUIMISTA PDF

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paulo coelho em. Baixar Livro O Alquimista Paulo Coelho Em. Page 1. Page 2. baixar livro o alquimista paulo coelho em baixar livro o alquimista pdf. Page 2. 28 abr. O Alquimista é um best-seller do escritor brasileiro Paulo Coelho, é um bestseller internacional, o livro brasileiro mais traduzido do mundo. Tobrigado pelos livros em PDF:) January 2 I've tried looking for the audiobook version of O Alquimista, but I could only find the Spanish and English versions.


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baixar livro o alquimista paulo coelho em. Baixar Livro O Alquimista Paulo Coelho Em baixar livro o alquimista paulo coelho em baixar livro o alquimista pdf. Buy O Alquimista (Portuguese Edition): Read Kindle Store Reviews - cittadelmonte.info Este livro é incrível, inspiração e lição de cittadelmonte.info Coelho se. O Alquimista Ed Comemorativa 20 Anos Paulo Coelho. Resumo do Livro O Alquimista - Edição Comemorativa Exclusiva em PDF.

One of the best ways to improve your Portuguese is by attempting to read a book written in the language. If you don't mind reading on a screen, finding suitable Brazilian texts from the late 19th and early 20th century is easy because they are in the public domain. For example, searching for literature in Portuguese on the site http: Incidentally, if the challenge of reading classic literature appeals to you, grab this nicely formatted PDF copy of Dom Casmurro by Machado de Assis. It is much more difficult to find modern novels that can be downloaded legally.

If I were you I would read something you have already read and liked and now try it in Portuguese. I'm sure you're right and that's why it's fortunate that these books are available for free download. Coelho is not to everyone's taste, but many people have read the English language editions of his books and can now try them in Portuguese.

I absolutely love that.

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I think it's ridiculous to make people pay for ebooks, and I've always thought that I would want to do that same thing if I were to publish books. I'm going to have to brush up a bit on my Portuguese and dive into one of these books.

I'd love to read one along with an audiobook. I find that that helps my listening comprehension tremendously. I've tried looking for the audiobook version of O Alquimista, but I could only find the Spanish and English versions. I'll have to do some more searching later. Maybe selling more than million books has coloured Coelho's viewpoint.

He has a similar attitude towards audiobook downloads and after he discovered the English language version of The Alchemist on YouTube now removed he wrote a blog entry that includes this appeal:. I already own the book so now I can feel less guilty listening to this Portuguese recording of O Alquimista:. I hope you are not too disappointed, but that was Paulo Lins - you can "look inside" his book here: Here's the script itself: I'd be lying if I said I wasn't, but still, my thanks for posting this.

Here you can read these books: Wattpad is also a great place for literature; people can change the language to Portuguese and read from Brazilian writers.

I guess it can be helpful for learning slang too. I'm a native speaker of Portuguese, but I read books there sometimes, too.

Paulo Coelho is popular, but writes lousy self-help pseudo-religious fiction. If you're not into that don't waste your time. Many of us learnt our native language reading fairy tales and the like. O Alquimsta , for example, is not much better than a fairy tale I agree, but it is aimed at adults while still written in fairly simple language so I don't think it's such a bad first step for Portuguese language learners especially if they have the English language version to hand as a reference.

The main reason I posted this article was to alert people that it's legal to sample Coelho's work for free. If you have any suggestions for something better, particularly if it has the same freedom of access, please let us know. Its content is very educational with a simple language and it has transcriptions: Thank you.

Podcasts with transcripts are really useful too. A few more are mentioned here: These editions do come with this request though: Coelho seems to think that Personal Legends are fixed at childhood or at birth, or even before and are not changeable: But in my experience, many people have chosen to adjust, compromise, and even 'give up' on their dreams, only to find that life grants them something better, or they have a new, better dream to follow, a path providing greater wisdom.

View all 52 comments. Sarah Otto. Timing is everything. It deals in big, bold pronouncements of 'follow your dreams' et cetera et cetera, and it certainly makes you think about your own life and the pursuit of your own "Personal Legend" if you will. But maybe I'm older and more cynical now, or maybe it's not cynicism so much as just seeing a reality that isn't so mystical and black and white as Paulo Coelho's, but in any event, I just wasn't buying what Timing is everything.

But maybe I'm older and more cynical now, or maybe it's not cynicism so much as just seeing a reality that isn't so mystical and black and white as Paulo Coelho's, but in any event, I just wasn't buying what ' The Alchemist ' was selling. It's a good, quick read, I'll give it that. I enjoyed myself, and I definitely thought a little bit about my own life in the process, which I appreciate from my literature.

And while I was more or less with it for a while, I just couldn't stay on board with an ending that left me saying, "that's it? The whole book Santiago is in pursuit of his "Personal Legend", which he is told is a great treasure found in the pyramids of Egypt. Along the way he befriends many people and makes a great sum of money, while also meeting a beautiful young woman who agrees to more or less be his life-partner, Romeo and Juliet -style which is stupid in and of itself, but more on that later.

It is at this point that he determines he has achieved a greater treasure than any he had ever dreamed of, and would go no further. Cue the music and themes of recognizing treasure in all its forms.

Santiago has a wonderful, fulfilling life laid out before him, and would most likely die a happy man by the side of his lovely wife and adoring children, all while living comfortably as village counselor of a beautiful desert oasis. Sounds pretty nice, no? Well, that's where the book lost it's footing. Santiago is urged, coerced even, into continuing to follow his "Personal Legend", leaving behind his "love" who, it should be mentioned is a "woman of the desert" and so is completely fine being abandoned by her "love" and will simply wait and wait and wait for him, whether he ever returns or not traversing the desert and bizarrely evading a hostile army along the way by turning himself into the wind it makes about as much sense as it sounds.

In the end though, Coelho reveals to us that Santiago does, indeed, reach his "Personal Legend" in a two and a half page epilogue, where it is shoddily revealed that Santiago's long-sought after treasure is Buried treasure.

A box in the sand filled with gold coins and diamonds and jewelry and crowns, and all the other cliche treasure images you can think up.

What the hell? So what message are we supposed to take from this book then? Money is the most important thing in the world? Women are objects meant to be seen and valued for their beauty, there to serve you and wait around forever while you go on wild goose chases across continents in search of money?

Obviously I'm being facetious, and Coelho intended to say that one should follow their dreams no matter what, even if it transcends a nice, content life, so long as you are in pursuit of a life that would be even greater than you can ever imagine, sacrificing what is good now for what can be great later.

But he did so in an extremely simplistic way, and the revelation of the Santiago's treasure being literally treasure was a major disappointment. The thing was, despite his simplicity, the book had a nice message going for a while. If Fatima was Santiago's treasure, that I could have gotten behind, even if it shows a good deal of contempt for the role of women in relationships beauty being the most important factor in deciding on a mate, as Santiago is struck by her beauty and immediately professes his love; Fatima more or less acquiesces immediately and pledges herself to Santiago no matter what, even if he must travel the desert forever in selfish pursuit of his own dreams, with no regard for her , because that is something intangible that is meaningful and fulfilling, regardless of financial standing.

But then Coelho basically goes on to say that that is just a roadblock in the way of real achievement, and that one should selfishly pursue their own dreams with no regard for those closest to them. How a book can go on and on talking about seeing the everyday symbols and omens in life and taking heed of them, presumably leaving metaphors for life all along the way, and then have what was presumably the biggest metaphor of them all, Santiago's treasure, turn out not to be a metaphor at all, but just money?

To me, that summed up everything. I suppose Coelho realizes this, as he begins the book with a brief fable about Narcissus falling into the river because he loved staring at his reflection, and the river's disappointment in this, as the river loved gazing into Narcissus's eyes and seeing the reflection of itself. This is a horrible little story implying that everyone is obsessed only with themselves, a sad, empty little thought that Coelho spends pages endorsing wholeheartedly, under the guise of following your dreams.

I understand that other people love this book and find it inspiring, and I think I would have felt the same way years ago, when I was just out of college and it appeared I had my whole life ahead of me and a lifetime to live it.

I'm older now, and I've found someone who I consider to be a real treasure, and while I still have dreams, I'm not willing to sacrifice the happiness that this life brings me every day in a single-minded pursuit of something that I want for selfish reasons fame, fortune, etc.

If I was Santiago, I would have never left Fatima in the first place if she truly made me happy, as Santiago claimed she did. Perhaps that makes me a coward in Coelho's eyes, not unlike the Crystal merchant from the story. But it'd also make me not the sad Englishman, whose single-minded pursuit of his "personal legend" had cost him all his money, friends, and family and left him alone in an oasis burning lead in a tent in the vain hopes it will turn to gold.

I guess what I'm trying to say in this long-winded review, is that this book is all about being selfish and doing what you think will make you happy, regardless of everything else. I can see why that appeals to people, especially those who want to show the doubters and find their own treasure beneath a sycamore tree, but it's sad, in a way.

We live in a culture where everyone wants selfish things like fame or money or power, just to satisfy some gaping hole in their own souls, ignoring the real problems that lead to these compulsions in the first place.

To me, this book feeds and even encourages that misplaced ideal, and that's a shame. View all 15 comments. View all 29 comments. View all 48 comments. The book is full of messages and symbolizes our life actions interwoven in a very complex yet in elementary patterns which can be deciphered if one persists and have longing in his heart. It is not just following the heart blindly; but never ignoring what it says. Its important message is to keep accord with your heart no matter where it takes you.

Because the treasure is where there is heart. Now, that was the gist of the book. But my reading experience with this book was horrible and most impo The book is full of messages and symbolizes our life actions interwoven in a very complex yet in elementary patterns which can be deciphered if one persists and have longing in his heart.

But my reading experience with this book was horrible and most importantly - boring. It was a let down except for its insights which were rather scattered but were impactful. It was more like a new age book, with some elements of prophetic vision, aimed at opening a new dimension of spiritual values within. However, it didn't struck a chord. View all 36 comments. I've been meaning to read this for years; I probably should have left it a mystery because it irritated me no end.

He sets off, spends some time in Tangier and then sets of I've been meaning to read this for years; I probably should have left it a mystery because it irritated me no end.

cittadelmonte.info: O Alquimista (Portuguese Edition) eBook: Paulo Coelho: Kindle Store

He sets off, spends some time in Tangier and then sets off with a desert caravan. He arrives at an oasis, falls in love and meets an alchemist who teaches him about the soul of the world and how to listen to his heart. He finds his treasure after some ups and downs. On one level a simple heart-warming story of how to get your hearts desire by listening to your own inner voice and the world around you; it's that simple!

So why did it wind me up so much? A brief aside; the best review I have read of this book is a one liner; "Jonathon Livingston Seagull meets Lawrence of Arabia" Actually I thought the philosophy was more akin to Ayn Rand, it is very individualistic and you are the master of your own destiny.

Of course, that only applies if you are a bloke; the women in the novel very few , didn't do a lot. Fatima the love interest lived in an oasis and was content to stay there whilst her love was off having adventures and finding destinies.

It was enough for her to wait for her man, knowing that he would return for her one day if he wasn't daft enough to get himself killed, die of thirst in the desert, forget her or just get bored of her.

An excellent role model for all modern women? What really irritated me was the implication if you didn't manage to fulfil your destiny, it was your fault. Obviously those in grinding poverty or dying young of cancer really need to get a grip of themselves.

View all 16 comments. Audio narrated by Jeremy Irons 4h So I have been staring at my phone for about 10 minutes trying to figure out what I should write for a review. I know I am going to spend a lot of my life in the future apologizing to other readers around the world who absolutely adore this book, but it felt a bit predictable and flat for me.

View all 26 comments. Muhammad Ahmed Siddiqui. I give this book two stars instead of one because I live by a lot of the messages Paulo Coelho puts forth in The Alchemist. I identify with the themes of prioritizing values over fear, pursuing your personal myth, and savoring every moment instead of getting lost in the past or the future. But I could not invest myself the prose or the story of The Alchemist.

Coelo's simple writing makes this book a quick, easy read. It also drains the life out of the book, rendering it an allegory with little e I give this book two stars instead of one because I live by a lot of the messages Paulo Coelho puts forth in The Alchemist. It also drains the life out of the book, rendering it an allegory with little emotional impact. While one might expect fiction to combine deeper messages with quality storytelling, Santiago's flatness as a character and the one-dimensional world of The Alchemist did not come close to touching my heart.

You can get all of the insight of this book and more, as well as ways to apply such knowledge, from wonderful self-help books like Self Compassion by Kristin Neff and Daring Greatly by Brene Brown.

Also, I detested the portrayal of romantic love and women in this book. Santiago falls in "love" with Fatima just by looking at her he did the same with another character earlier in the story and she just disappeared without a trace. And when Santiago leaves Fatima to pursue his journey, Coehlo turns her into a lovesick girl with no interests, desires, or passions other than waiting for Santiago's return. She serves as his romantic interest and nothing more. Their relationship had no substance, and Fatima, as the main female character of the story, deserved so much more development i.

Overall, I feel glad that The Alchemist can inspire introspection and conversation about deeper life issues like the journey to personal fulfillment and how to thrive in the face of fear. My little cousin, who I love, wrote a stellar essay about this book. The Alchemist , to my great disappointment, just did not work for me.

View all 14 comments. View all 40 comments. His quest will lead him to riches far different than he ever imagined.

Let me preface this review by saying that although I did not like this book, I totally appreciate the meaning behind the fable and the message being put forward here well It was just done so in the most tedious and boring way possible. Throughout the entire novel you are just bludgeoned to death with the concept of your Personal Legend. I am all about pursuing your dreams and not being afraid to do so. Perhaps I am not spiritual enough to fully embrace The Alchemist. I was rolling my eyes so often that I almost detached my retinas And there were some nice illustrations I also found it to be quite preachy and condescending at times.

One and a half stars. View all 5 comments. View all 22 comments. It is a simple book and must have been easy to translate and, even so, it had many issues.

I get it — The journey is the destination. View all 8 comments. This book is not playing with a full deck. When Andrew was taking CCD classes to earn his First Communion, one of the things he was given was a dumbed down—and I mean severely dumbed down—booklet of the Gospels.

It mostly ignored John, though, whose Gospel account is too different from the others to reconcile into the mix. If an adult were to read any part of this mishmash, he This book is not playing with a full deck.

If an adult were to read any part of this mishmash, he would notice right away how juvenile is the manner in which the stories are recounted. But the message itself gets through, and I think whoever assembled the booklet probably felt that the message—rather than the specifics—is what was important. Well, reading The Alchemist was, I have to say, a lot like reading one of these infantile booklets.

I like that he compares the loathing people have for it to the loathing of what he considers to be other easy targets, like Celine Dion. I also like that he was drunk when he wrote it. But even though nobody in his right mind would ever admit to liking Celine Dion, at least she has an objectively decent voice. This book, on the other hand, has few redeeming qualities, if any.

That is stupid. Please stop teaching people that. Anwyay, I think the derision this book receives is mostly on account of its peurile philosophizing and that it possibly purports itself to be something greater than it is. For me, though, I see this book as mostly a few bricks short of a load, not the sharpest tool in the shed, and by far not the brightest bulb in the box.

But it tries. View all 38 comments. As if! Which universe are we talking about then?

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In all fairness to Paulo Coelho though, The Alchemist is narrated in the style of a fable, and fables are not meant to be taken literally. It all seems very Woodstock to me. I have read online articles about this book praising it for the life lessons it allegedly contains. I have to admit that I have gained no insight at all from reading this book.

I tried reading between the lines but all I saw were blank spaces. This book reminds me a little bit of Life of Pi , though "Pi" is much more appealing. Wait a minute, I am beginning to sound like I am disparaging this allegedly profound little best selling book.

I actually quite enjoyed reading it, taken at face value without trying to decipher the meaning of life, the universe and everything it is a fairly entertaining book.

I was not bored at any point, but I did chuckle a few times at how ludicrous I find the philosophical discussions to be. The trouble with the fable format is that I could not believe any of it anymore than I can believe a wolf can blow houses down unless it is some kind of cyborg wolf. The characters in this novel do not behave in the way real people do. For example, the protagonist Santiago declares his love for the desert girl Fatima on their first meeting and she does not bat an eyelid.

She even agrees to wait for him for however long he takes to complete his life mission to achieve his Personal Legend.

Surely even love at first sight is more subtle than this. The numerous sage passages are mostly nonsensical to me. But everything that happens twice will surely happen a third time. How is anything supposed to happen twice let alone thrice if they can not happen more than once? Am I reading this too literally again? Gimme some of that weed man! The audiobook I read is beautifully narrated by Jeremy Irons who sounds almost exactly like Neil Gaiman here if you have listened to Neil Gaiman narrating a book you will know what I mean.

O Alquimista

A huge improvement on his reading of Lolita which I think is a little over the top and rendered that book harder to follow. So, my Goodreads friends, is this a good read?

Laughable philosophy notwithstanding, it passes the time pleasantly enough. Highly recommended if you are going to San Francisco wearing some flowers in your hair. Paulo and his esteem-treasure-hunters I'm never been this mad on myself huh! It is one thing to read a great book and be inspired. It is an entirely different thing for the author to throw it in your face If you have Paulo and his esteem-treasure-hunters If you haven't started this book, don't bother.

I will give it enough credit to say it was better than the Nanny Diaries. Although anything would be a better read than that horrid excuse for a book Sorry, still mad at myself at wasting time on reading something so awful. Well do your self a favor and read it as last book on planet left View all 11 comments.

Dec 25, Dream. View all 34 comments. Not my cup of tea. I feel like it tries way too hard to be all profound and intellectual but ends up being just portentous.

I understand why it got so popular, it surely is quotable, but for me it seems too preachy, pretentious and I really disliked flimsy portrayal of women in this book. If you're looking for a story about some inspirational journey, "The Journey to the East" by Hermann Hesse is a million times better.

That one is actu Rating: That one is actually profound without all the pomposity of "The Alchemist". Ne man tokios knygos. Gavos pompastika. View all 3 comments. I do not feel this book is a new addition for me! I am Faithful and the Faithful knows that: God is give us all the universe.. I do not know the real reason behind the dazzle of some readers do, but only if they are of those who suffer from spiritual emptiness and lack of awareness and faith!

View all 12 comments. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While this book made some points that I agreed with all things in the universe are one; a person is happiest when living in the present moment, rather than the past or future; even things that seem like detours in your quest toward achieving your goals can be rich opportunities for learning I just couldn't buy a lot of it.

For instance, I disagreed with the idea that your experience along the way shouldn't cause you to change your basic course. What's accumulated wisdom and experience for, if While this book made some points that I agreed with all things in the universe are one; a person is happiest when living in the present moment, rather than the past or future; even things that seem like detours in your quest toward achieving your goals can be rich opportunities for learning I just couldn't buy a lot of it.

What's accumulated wisdom and experience for, if not to cause us to live differently often with very different goals, aspirations, and fundamental beliefs than we did when we were younger? I also couldn't buy the notion that your "Personal Legend" is made manifest to you in no uncertain terms when you are a child and you should never deviate from it.

I dreamed of doing a hundred different things at various times during my childhood. More than one of those aspirations psychiatrist, teacher, stay-at-home mom, sociologist at one time or another during my youth seemed, without question, like the path I should follow. As I get dangerously close to middle age, I'm finding that I'm really happy as a horticulturist and constantly learning and doing new things within that field.

I feel no regret at not having pursued those other paths. Also, I was left with the impression that the "Personal Legend" of the main female character in the story was to send kisses on the wind and wait for the safe return of her man.

I thought the book made an important point: But that should, obviously, be true for both partners. I'll give the author the benefit of the doubt and assume that he didn't focus much on Fatima's goals and dreams because that's not whose story he was telling.

I'm hoping that, though she takes time out of her day to think of her love and pray for his safe return, she's spending more of her time pursuing dreams of her own. View 2 comments.

It was all the way back in when I was lovingly passed down a copy of The Alchemist from my grandfather, its worn out pages and his words a promise that I was about to read something truly remarkable, something life-changing. I was ten years old then. The only thing I can still recall is feeling rather proud of the fact that I'd actually managed to finish the whole book.

I'm seventeen years old now. And the only thing I know is that I simply cannot get myself to finish the whole book anymore.

ROXANNA from Minnesota
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