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WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS BOOK PDF

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63 SNOWMAN WHERE THE SIDEWALK ENDS There is a place where the sidewalk ends And before the street .. Could it be popcorn or marbles or books?. SILVERSTEIN Where the Sidewalk Ends is a children's poetry Christmas Outlaw Shifters Book 2 Walther Pk Manual Safety File Type Pdf Purdue. Download Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings book pdf | audio id: ys5spma. Download Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings book pdf | .


Where The Sidewalk Ends Book Pdf

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Where the Sidewalk Ends Shel Silverstein 9 INVITATION If you are a dreamer, come in. If you are a DOWNLOAD PDF And turnin' pages of his book. Lots of . To the place where the sidewalk ends. Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow,. And we'll go where the chalk-‐white arrows go,. For the children. 82 Where the Sidewalk Ends - Silverstein, cittadelmonte.info - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. Hop on Pop (Beginner Books). Uploaded by. chienthangvn1.

Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. Books by Language. He also writes songs, draws cartoons, sings, plays the guitar, and has a good time. All rights reserved No part of this book may be used or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles and reviews. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar, A hope-er, a pray-er, a magic bean buyer.

He loved to watch his TV set Almost as much as you. He watched till his eyes were frozen wide. And his bottom grew into his chair. And his chin turned into a tuning dial. And antennae grew out of his hair. And his brains turned into TV tubes. And his face to a TV screen. And two knobs saying "vert. And he grew a plug that looked like a tail So we plugged in little Jim. And now instead of him watching TV We all sit around and watch him. Oh, if you're a bird, be an early bird And catch the worm for your breakfast plate.

If you're a bird, be an early early bird — But if you're a worm, sleep late. Delicious delicious A bit like plaster. But so delicious, goodness sake — I could have eaten a lentil-soup lake. It's amazing the difference A bit of sky can make. Who wants a pancake, Sweet and piping hot? Good little Grace looks up and says, "I'll take the one on top. Fresh off the griddle? Terrible Theresa smiles and says, "I'll take the one in the middle. And then I took the quarters And traded them to Lou For three dimes — I guess he don't know That three is more than two!

82 Where the Sidewalk Ends - Silverstein, Shel.pdf

And I took the nickels to Hiram Coombs Down at the seed-feed store. And the fool gave me five pennies for them, And five is more than four! And then I went and showed my dad.

And he got red in the cheeks And closed his eyes and shook his head — Too proud of me to speak! We're always together As you can see. On movies and ladies We cannot agree. I like to dance He loves to ski. He likes the mountains I love the sea. I like hot chocolate He wants his tea. I want to sleep He has to pee. He's meaner and duller And fatter than me. But I guess there's worse things We could be — Instead of two we could be three.

Me and him Him and me. And goodness and kindness and gentleness, sweetness and rightness: Hello Pardon me How are you?

Excuse me Bless you?

Where the Sidewalk Ends

Thank you Goodbye If you know some that I've forgot, , please stick them in your eye! I step very softly, I walk very slow, I can't do a handstand — I might overflow. So pardon the wild crazy thing I just said — I'm just not the same since there's rain in my head.

Said one unto the other, "If you're a box, And I'm a box. Then you must be my brother. Our sides are thin, We're cavin' in, And we must get no thinner. And some wild outlaws chased me And they shot me in the side. So I crawled into a wildcat's cave To find a place to hide, But some pirates found me sleeping there, And soon they had me tied To a pole and built a fire Under me — I almost cried Till a mermaid came and cut me loose And begged to be my bride.

But an eagle came and swooped me up And through the air we flied, But he dropped me in a boiling lake A thousand miles wide. I'm being eaten by a boa constrictor, And I don't like it — one bit.

Well, what do you know? It's nibblin' my toe. Oh, gee. It's up to my knee. Oh my. It's up to my thigh. Oh, fiddle. It's up to my middle. Oh, heck, It's up to my neck. Oh, dread, It's upmmmmmmmmmmffffffffff.

Leaky boats that wouldn't float And stopped-up horns that wouldn't toot. Butter knives that had no handles, Copper keys that fit no locks, Rings that were too small for fingers, Dried-up leaves and patched-up socks. Worn-out belts that had no buckles, 'Lectric trains that had no tracks, Airplane models, broken bottles, Three-legged chairs and cups with cracks.

Hector the Collector Loved these things with all his soul — Loved them more than shining diamonds, Loved them more than glistenin' gold. Hector called to all the people, "Come and share my treasure trunk! Invented a light that plugs into the sun. The sun is bright enough. The bulb is strong enough. But, oh, there's only one thing wrong. The cord ain't long enough. Fifty cents for fat ones, Twenty cents for lean ones. Fifteen cents for dirty ones.

Thirty cents for clean ones, A nickel each for mean ones. The googies are coming, and maybe tonight, To buy little children and lock them up tight.

Eighty cents for husky ones. Quarter for the weak ones, Penny each for noisy ones, A dollar for the meek ones. Forty cents for happy ones, Eleven cents for sad ones. And, kiddies, when they come to buy. It won't do any good to cry. But — just between yourself and I — They never buy the bad ones! One sister for sale! One crying and spying young sister for sale! I'm really not kidding. So who'll start the bidding?

Do I hear a dollar? A nickel? A penny? Oh, isn't there, isn't there, isn't there any One kid who will buy this old sister for sale, This crying and spying young sister for sale? But they started to squeak, "Hey, we're tryin' to sleep. We were snuggled up tight Till you let in the light. You big silly sap, let us finish our nap. Now close up the lid! Will somebody please pass the beans? The teardrop of a crying ant would be your swimming pool.

A crumb of cake would be a feast And last you seven days at least, A flea would be a frightening beast If you were one inch tall. If you were only one inch tall, you'd walk beneath the door, And it would take about a month to get down to the store.

A bit of fluff would be your bed, You'd swing upon a spider's thread, And wear a thimble on your head If you were one inch tall. You'd surf across the kitchen sink upon a stick of gum.

You couldn't hug your mama, you'd just have to hug her thumb. Frogs dwell here and crickets too. Ain't no ceiling, only blue Jays dwell here and sunbeams too.

Floors are flowers — take a few. Ferns grow here and daisies too. Whoosh, swoosh — too-whit, too-woo, Bats dwell here and hoot owls too. Ha-ha-ha, hee-hee, hoo-hoooo, Gnomes dwell here and goblins too. And my child, I thought you knew I dwell here. My mouth is wet, my throat is dry, I'm going blind in my right eye. My tonsils are as big as rocks, I've counted sixteen chicken pox And there's one more — that's seventeen. And don't you think my face looks green?

My leg is cut, my eyes are blue — It might be instamatic flu. I cough and sneeze and gasp and choke, I'm sure that my left leg is broke — zk. My belly button's caving in, My back is wrenched, my ankle's sprained, My 'pendix pains each time it rains. My nose is cold, my toes are numb, I have a sliver in my thumb. My neck is stiff, my voice is weak, I hardly whisper when I speak. My tongue is filling up my mouth, I think my hair is falling out.

My elbow's bent, my spine ain't straight, My temperature is one-o-eight. My brain is shrunk, I cannot hear, There is a hole inside my ear. I have a hangnail, and my heart is — what? What's that? What's that you say? You say today is. G'bye, I'm going out to play! Inside my hat, all cozy in My hair, my hair, my hair. I've moved a dozen times and still They're there, they're there, they're there. I'd like to get away from them. But where, but where, but where? This hat just isn't big enough To share, to share, to share.

Sprouts all growin', cornin' up glowin', Fruit of jewels all shinin' in the sun. Colors of the rainbow. See the sun and rain grow Sapphires and rubies on ivory vines, 1 Grapes of jade, just Ripenin' in the shade, just Ready for the squeezin' into green jade wine. Pure gold corn there, Blowin' in the warm air, Ol' crow nibblin' on the amnythyst seeds.

In between the diamonds, ol' man Simon Crawls about pullin' out platinum weeds. Pink pearl berries, All you can carry, Put 'em in a bushel and Haul 'em into town. Up in the tree there's Opal nuts and gold pears — Hurry quick, grab a stick And shake some down. Take a silver tater, Emerald tomater. Fresh plump coral melons Hangin' in reach. Ol' man Simon, Diggin' in his diamonds,. Stops and rests and dreams about One. I can! Who fought tigers in the street While all the policemen ran and hid?

I did! Who will fly and have X-ray eyes — And be known as the man no bullet can kill? I will! Who can sit and tell lies all night? I might! Let us leave this place where the smoke blows black And the dark street winds and bends. Past the pits where the asphalt flowers grow We shall walk with a walk that is measured and slow, And watch where the chalk-white arrows go To the place where the sidewalk ends.

Yes we'll walk with a walk that is measured and slow, And we'll go where the chalk-white arrows go, For the children, they mark, and the children, they know The place where the sidewalk ends.

And the snowman stood alone As the winter snows were melting, And the pine trees seemed to groan, "Ah, you poor sad smiling snowman. You'll be melting by and by. For I'd like to see July. Yes, I'd like to see July, and please don't ask me why. But I'd like to, yes I'd like to, oh I'd like to see July. And the greatest ice must crumble When it's flowers' time to grow.

And as one thing is beginning So another thing must die. And there's never been a snowman Who has ever seen July. No, they never see July, no matter how they try. No, they never ever, never ever, never see July. And there he stood and faced the sun A blazin' from the sky — And I really cannot tell you If he ever saw July: Did he ever see July?

You can guess as well as I If he ever, if he never, if he ever saw July. And the dentist said, "Now tell me, sir, Why does it hurt and where? And the Crocodile cried, "You're hurting me so! Please put down your pliers and let me go. To North or South or East or West. He left no forwarding address.

But what's one dentist, more or less? But the taste of a thumb Is the sweetest taste yet As only we thumb-suckers know.

And with each one of these He simply wished for three more wishes, Which gave him three old wishes, plus nine new. And with each of these twelve He slyly wished for three more wishes. Which added up to forty-six— or is it fifty-two? Well anyway, he used each wish To wish for wishes 'til he had Five billion, seven million, eighteen thousand thirty-four.

And then he spread them on the ground And clapped his hands and danced around And skipped and sang, and then sat down And wished for more. And more. Lester sat amid his wealth Stacked mountain-high like stacks of gold. Sat and counted — and grew old. And then one Thursday night they found him Dead — with his wishes piled around him. And they counted the lot and found that not A single one was missing.

All shiny and new — here, take a few And think of Lester as you do. In a world of apples and kisses and shoes He wasted his wishes on wishing. She'd scour the pots and scrape the pans. Candy the yams and spice the hams, And though her daddy would scream and shout, She simply would not take the garbage out. And so it piled up to the ceilings: Coffee grounds, potato peelings, Brown bananas, rotten peas, Chunks of sour cottage cheese.

It filled the can, it covered the floor, It cracked the window and blocked the door With bacon rinds and chicken bones. Drippy ends of ice cream cones, Prune pits, peach pits, orange peel, Gloppy glumps of cold oatmeal. Pizza crusts and withered greens, Soggy beans and tangerines, Crusts of black burned buttered toast.

Gristly bits of beefy roasts. The garbage rolled on down the hall. It raised the roof, it broke the wall. I Greasy napkins, cookie crumbs, Globs of gooey bubble gum, Cellophane from green baloney, Rubbery blubbery macaroni, Peanut butter, caked and dry, Curdled milk and crusts of pie, Moldy melons, dried-up mustard, Eggshells mixed with lemon custard, Cold french fries and rancid meat.

Yellow lumps of Cream of Wheat. At last the garbage reached so high That finally it touched the sky. And all the neighbors moved away. And none of her friends would come to play. The garbage reached across the state.

From New York to the Golden Gate. And there, in the garbage she did hate, Poor Sarah met an awful fate, That I cannot right now relate Because the hour is much too late. But children, remember Sarah Stout And always take the garbage out! I want to rid my house of cats. I think someone put salt into your tea.

They're giving us eleven-month vacations. And Florida has sunk into the sea. Oh have you heard the President has measles? The principal has just burned down the school. So if you stick your finger in, He may bite off your nail. Stick it farther up inside, And he may bite your ring off. Stick it all the way, and he May bite the whole darn thing off. And they run around free while the world was bein' born. And the loveliest of all was the Unicorn.

There was green alligators and long-neck geese. Well anyway, he used each wish To wish for wishes 'til he had Five billion, seven million, eighteen thousand thirty-four. And then he spread them on the ground And clapped his hands and danced around And skipped and sang, and then sat down And wished for more. And more Lester sat amid his wealth Stacked mountain-high like stacks of gold. Sat and counted-and grew old. And then one Thursday night they found him Dead-with his wishes piled around him.

And they counted the lot and found that not A single one was missing. All shiny and new-here, take a few And think of Lester as you do. In a world of apples and kisses and shoes He wasted his wishes on wishing. She'd scour the pots and scrape the pans. Candy the yams and spice the hams, And though her daddy would scream and shout. She simply would not take the garbage out. And so it piled up to the ceilings: Coffee grounds, potato peelings. Brown bananas, rotten peas.

Chunks of sour cottage cheese. It filled the can, it covered the floor. It cracked the window and blocked the door With bacon rinds and chicken bones.

Drippy ends of ice cream cones. Prune pits, peach pits, orange peel, Gloppy glumps of cold oatmeal, Pizza crusts and withered greens. Soggy beans and tangerines. Crusts of black burned buttered toast. Gristly bits of beefy roasts The garbage rolled on down the hall. It raised the roof, it broke the wall Globs of gooey bubble gum. Cellophane from green baloney. Rubbery blubbery macaroni, Peanut butter, caked and dry. Curdled milk and crusts of pie.

Moldy melons, dried-up mustard, Eggshells mixed with lemon custard. Cold french fries and rancid meat. Yellow lumps of Cream of Wheat. At last the garbage reached so high That finally it touched the sky.

And all the neighbors moved away. And none of her friends would come to play. The garbage reached across the state. From New York to the Golden Gate. And there, in the garbage she did hate. Poor Sarah met an awful fate. That I cannot right now relate Because the hour is much too late.

But children, remember Sarah Stout And always take the garbage out! I want to rid my house of cats. Now Dad is saying, "Where the heck's the toilet plunger gone?

You must learn how to make a perfect chicken-dumpling stew. And you must sew my holey socks, And soothe my troubled mind.

And develop the knack for scratching my back. And keep my shoes spotlessly shined. And while I rest you must rake up the leaves, And when it is hailing and snowing You must shovel the walk And-hey-where are you going? I think someone put salt into your tea. They're giving us eleven-month vacations. And Florida has sunk into the sea. Oh have you heard the President has measles? The principal has just burned down the school. So if you stick your finger in, He may bite off your nail. Stick it farther up inside, And he may bite your ring off.

Stick it all the way, and he May bite the whole darn thing off. There was green alligators and long-neck geese. There was humpy bumpy camels and chimpanzees. There was catsandratsandelephants, but sure as you're born The loveliest of all was the Unicorn. But the Lord seen some sinnin', and it caused him pain. He says, "Stand back, I'm gonna make it rain. Go and build me a floatin' zoo. And you take two alligators, and a couple of geese, Two humpy bumpy camels and two chimpanzees.

Take two catsandratsandelephants, but sure as you're born Noah, don't you forget my Unicorn. He marched in the animals two by two. And he called out as they went through, "Hey Lord, I got your two alligators and your couple of geese. Your humpy bumpy camels and your two chimpanzees. But the Unicorns were hidin', playin' silly games. They were kickin' and splashin' in the misty morn, Oh them silly Unicorn. Then the goat started goatin', and the snake started snakin'. The elephant started elephantin', and the boat started shakin'.

The mouse started squeakin', and the lion started roarin'. And everyone's aboard but the Unicorn. I mean the green alligators and the long-neck geese. The humpy bumpy camels and the chimpanzees. Noah cried, "Close the door 'cause the rain is pourin'And we just can't wait for them Unicorn. And the Unicorns looked up from the rock and cried. And the water come up and sort of floated them awayThat's why you've never seen a Unicorn to this day.

You'll see a lot of alligators and a whole mess of geese. You'll see humpy bumpy camels and lots of chimpanzees. You'll see catsandratsandelephants, but sure as you're born You're never gonna see no Unicorn. A street house, a neat house. Be sure and wipe your feet house Is not my kind of house at allLet's go live in a tree house.

And we'll fly to the outermost tip of the moon. The Flying Festoon and I. I'm taking a sandwich, and ball and a prune, And we're leaving this evening precisely at noon. For I'm going to fly with The Flying Festoon Just as soon as he learns how to fly. Big as a giant. We're all the same size When we turn off the light. Rich as a sultan, Poor as a mite. We're all worth the same When we turn off the light. Red, black or orange, Yellow or white. We all look the same When we turn off the light.

So maybe the way To make everything right Is for God to just reach out And turn off the light! Feeding a piece of invisible cheese To a little invisible mouse. Oh, what a beautiful picture to see! Will you draw an invisible picture for me? That's what you get for tryin' To be polite.

But he only loved one single thingAnd that was just a peanut-butter sandwich. His scepter and his royal gowns. His regal throne and golden crowns Were brown and sticky from the mounds And drippings from each peanut-butter sandwich. He would not eat his sovereign steak. He scorned his soup and kingly cake, And told his courtly cook to bake An extra-sticky peanut-butter sandwich. And then one day he took a bite And started chewing with delight, But found his mouth was stuck quite tight From that last bite of peanut-butter sandwich.

His brother pulled, his sister pried. The wizard pushed, his mother cried, "My boy's committed suicide From eating his last peanut-butter sandwich! The royal plumber banged and knocked. But still those jaws stayed tightly locked. Oh darn that sticky peanut-butter sandwich! The telephone man tried with wires. The firemen, they tried with fire, But couldn't melt that peanut-butter sandwich. With ropes and pulleys, drills and coil. With steam and lubricating oilFor twenty years of tears and toilThey fought that awful peanut-butter sandwich.

Then all his royal subjects came. They hooked his jaws with grapplin' chains And pulled both ways with might and main Against that stubborn peanut-butter sandwich. Each man and woman, girl and boy Put down their ploughs and pots and toys And pulled until kerack! Oh, joyThey broke right through that peanut-butter sandwich.

A puff of dust, a screech, a squeakThe king's jaw opened with a creak. And then in voice so faint and weakThe first words that they heard him speak Were, "How about a peanut-butter sandwich? Don't you believe a word of that. For I've been down to the edge of the world. Sat on the edge where the wild wind whirled.

And into his sleigh climbed he. On, Prancer! On, Donner and Blitzen! On, Comet and Cupid! And all the reindeers leaped but one. And that one stood silently. He had pulled the sleigh for a thousand years. And never a word spoke he. Now he stood in the snow, and he whispered low- "Oh what do you have for me? The reindeer stood as if made of wood"But what do you have for me? The reindeer winked at a falling star"But what do you have for me? And he found a tiny flea.

And he put it into the reindeer's ear, And the reindeer said, "For me? Oh gee! And the moral of this yuletide tale You know as well as me. Lou can. Just how few can Ride the toucan? Two can. What kind of goo can Stick you to the toucan? Glue can. Who can write some More about the toucan? You can! And they have the same shoes and same laces. And they have the same charms and same graces. And they have the same heads and same faces But not in the Very same Places.

So I'm all of love that could make it today. I can't see my shirt-it's so covered with dirt, And my ears have enough to grow flowers. But the water is either a little too hot. Or else it's a little too cold. I'm musty and dusty and patchy and scratchy And mangy and covered with mold. But the water is always a little too hot.

If you looked down my throat with a flashlight, you'd note That my insides are coated with rust. I creak when I walk and I squeak when I talk. And each time I sneeze I blow dust. The thought of a towel and some soap makes me howl. And when people have something to tell me They don't come and tell it-they stand back and yell it.

I think they're afraid they might smell me. The bedbugs that leap on me sing me to sleep. And the garbage flies buzz me awake. They're the best friends I've found and I fear they might drown So I never go too near a lake.

Each evening at nine I sit down to dine With the termites who live in my chair. And I joke with the bats and have intimate chats With the cooties who crawl through my hair. I'd brighten my life if I just found a wife. But I fear that that never will be Until I can find a girl, gentle and kind. With a beautiful face and a sensitive mind. Who sparkles and twinkles and glistens and shines- And who's almost as dirty as me.

Sunday dinner isn't sunny Easter feasts are just bad luck When you see it from the viewpoint Of a chicken or a duck. Oh how I once loved tuna salad Pork and lobsters, lamb chops too Till I stopped and looked at dinner From the dinner's point of view.

Over the carpet and under the chairs. Into the hammock and wound round the stairs, Filling the bathtub and covering the desk, Making the sofa a mad mushy mess. The party is ruined, I'm terribly worried, The guests have all left unless they're all buried. I told them, "Bring presents. And Christopher John helped bake it. Christopher John, he mowed the lawn.

And Agatha Fry helped rake it. Zachary Zugg took out the rug, And Jennifer Joy helped shake it. And Jennifer Joy, she made a toy. And Zachary Zugg helped break it. And some kind of help Is the kind of help That helping's all about. And some kind of help Is the kind of help We all can do without. But if suddenly one day he had A lot of little brontosauriI would change his name To Laurie.

He hasn't changed his clothes since last July. And why? And all that he can take off are his socks and shoes and tie, And all that he can do is sit and bite his tongue and cry. And he cannot take a bath-so just lets the water run. And he can't go to the toilet, and he can't get any sun, And life just isn't any fun For Benjamin Bunnn, from Wilmington, Whose buttons will not come undone. All right. For you've gone and drunk it up, dear.

And she isn't in the cup, dear. And she's nowhere to be found, dear. Do you think that she has drowned, dear? He'll pretend he's your friend As he cuts all the grass on your lawn. But do not leave anything Sticking far out Or swishity-it will be gone.

Luckily, I know this about him While he knows almost nothing of me! Exactly why I do not know. I kicked and cried And hollered "Oh"The Yipiyuk would not let go. I whispered to him soft and low- The Yipiyuk would not let go. Yes, that was sixteen years ago. And the Yipiyuk still won't let go. The snow may fall. The winds may blowThe Yipiyuk will not let go. The snow may melt. The grass may growThe Yipiyuk will not let go. I drag him 'round each place I go.

82 Where the Sidewalk Ends - Silverstein, cittadelmonte.info

This Yipiyuk that won't let go. And now my child at last you know Exactly why I walk so slow. What's in the sack? Is it some mushrooms or is it the moon? Is it love letters or downy goosefeathers? Or maybe the world's most enormous balloon? That's all they ask me. Could it be popcorn or marbles or books? Is it two years' worth of your dirty laundry, Or the biggest ol' meatball that's ever been cooked? Does anyone ask me, "Hey, when is your birthday? That's all they care about. Is it a rock or a rolled-up giraffe?

Is it pickles or nickels or busted bicycles? And if we guess it, will you give us half? Do they ask where I've been, or how long I'll be stayin'. Where I'll be goin', or when I'll be back. Or "How do? Oh no. Not you, too! Barbara's eyes are blue as azure But she is in love with Freddy, Karen's sweet but Harry has her, Gentle Jane is going steady.

Carol hates me, so does May, Abigail will not be mine, Nancy lives too far away Won't you be my Valentine? And so she changed, while other folks Never tried nothin' at all. It was absolutely filthy I supposed. And so today I peeled it off The wall where it was leaning And stuck it in the washtub With the clothes.

I put in soap and bleach and stuff, I let it soak for hours, I wrung it out and hung it out to dry. And whoever would have thunk That it would have gone and shrunk For now it's so much Littler than I. All you do is simply take One slice of bread, One slice of cake, Some mayonnaise.

One onion ring. One hippopotamus.

One piece of string, A dash of pepper- That ought to do it. And now comes the problem Biting into it! Coffee, pumpkin, fudge-banana, Caramel cream and boysenberry. Rocky road and toasted almond, Butterscotch, vanilla dip. Butter-brickle, apple ripple. Coconut and mocha chip. Brandy peach and lemon custard, Each scoop lovely, smooth, and round. Tallest ice-cream cone in town. Lying there sniff on the ground. Of fluffy clouds and sky.

Of hope and daffodils. My baby brother ran away, And now my tuba will not play. I'm eight years old And turning grey, Oh what a day.

Oh what a day. But God gave us tasteys for maple ice cream. God gave us fingers-Ma says, "Use your hanky. God gave us fingers-Ma says, "Put your gloves on. God gave us fingers-Ma says, "Go wash 'em. And I ain't too smart, but there's one thing for certainEither Ma's wrong or else God is. My partner is Charlie O'Flynn. And I hold the nails For the big steel rails. And Charlie, he hammers 'em in. And most of the time He does just fine.

But now and again he fails. Maybe tomorrow I'll hammer 'em in, And let Charlie hold the nails. Zoom-varoom, trucks, trailers. Bikes and limousines, Clatterin' by-me oh my! Won't that light turn green?

But the days turned weeks, and the weeks turned months And there on the corner they stood, Twiddlin' their thumbs till the changin' comes The way good people should. And if you walk by that corner now. You may think it's rather strange To see them there as they hopefully gaze With the very same smile on their very same face As they patiently stand in the very same place And wait for the light to change. Poems and Drawings kf8 download Shel Silverstein 's children's books, stories, poetry, illustrations, fun activities for kids, and teaching resources.

Free Where the Sidewalk Ends: Poems and Drawings PDF. Poems and Drawings book pdf audio id: Copyright All rights reserved.

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