cittadelmonte.info Fiction Ebook S Of Witchcraft

EBOOK S OF WITCHCRAFT

Saturday, July 13, 2019


As autumn pushes the last bits of summer into the past and Halloween grows closer, our contemporary obsession with "witches" is renewed. Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft has influenced and guided countless students, coven initiates, and solitaries around the world. One of modern Wicca's . Regardless of your background with magic and witchcraft, these books will leave you spellbound.


Author:VIKI WESTABY
Language:English, Spanish, Arabic
Country:Vietnam
Genre:Children & Youth
Pages:703
Published (Last):23.06.2016
ISBN:497-6-80880-175-1
ePub File Size:27.62 MB
PDF File Size:16.37 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:36230
Uploaded by: MARILEE

There's a LOT of information about Wicca out there to absorb. Here's a list of 13 books from a variety of sources to get you started reading!. Results 1 - 30 of Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Witchcraft & Wicca Books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. The Penguin Book of Witches edited by Katherine Howe. Take a unique and compelling tour through the dark history of witchcraft with this.

Skip navigation! Story from Spirit. A few binge-viewed seasons of Charmed does not a witch make. Getting acquainted with, let alone settling into a regular practice of, Wiccan or Pagan beliefs is a lengthy, highly personal process. It helps if you know someone who already observes a nature-based faith or, at the very least, if you have a shelf stocked with introductory tomes on the subject.

Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other: Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. One of the modern Wicca's most recommended books, this comprehensive text features a step-by-step course in Witchcraft, with photographs and illustrations, rituals, beliefs, history, and lore, as well as intruction in spellwork, divination, herbalism, healing, channeling, dreamwork, sabbats, esbats, covens, and solitary practice.

The workbook formats includes exam question One of the modern Wicca's most recommended books, this comprehensive text features a step-by-step course in Witchcraft, with photographs and illustrations, rituals, beliefs, history, and lore, as well as intruction in spellwork, divination, herbalism, healing, channeling, dreamwork, sabbats, esbats, covens, and solitary practice. The workbook formats includes exam questions at the end of each lesson, so you can build a permanent record of your spiritual and magical training.

Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published September 8th by Llewellyn Publications first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft , please sign up. Vassia Dimokosta You can google a pdf version of the book, or you can read it online on issuu.

See 2 questions about Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order.

Aug 05, Scott rated it did not like it Shelves: This book is responsible for more teeny-bopper wanna-be witches than any other book, with the exception of anything written by Silver Ravenwolf.

It is full of questionable history and embarrassing "rituals" that are made up by the author himself, although he'd have you believe they are authentic. Buckland as an author is terribly full of himself and has a tendency to cite his own works as resources. Try not to take it seriously if you do read it. View all 6 comments. Aug 27, TailFeather rated it did not like it Shelves: Had this book for many years, re-read it many times. I even thought about doing some of the things he says are rituals.

But I could never see how being naked, blindfolded, and my hands bound, with a man touching me with a sharp knife all over my body had anything to do with how I felt about the universe and the earth. Even though it's supposed to. I feel, like all other man-made religions, Buckland just made up his own rules and rituals.

Some I feel are highly misogynistic. I find his claims on Had this book for many years, re-read it many times. I find his claims on "Tradition" suspect and arrogant. He did not invent the universe, the earth, or how people learned to live with both. Neither did Gardner-or Gardner's family. If I could, I'd give this 0 stars simply because I don't want people just learning about Witchcraft to think this is the be-all and end-all of their journeys just because it's a "classic".

In the ensuing years as I learned just what I do believe in, I have read many books on Paganism, earth magic, Wicca, Witchcraft, etc. I have concluded I am my own religion, and books and other people can be guides and signposts. As well as cautionary tales. Please don't feel you HAVE TO believe any of these authors especially Buckland or anyone who claims to be a Traditionalist or anyone else to know where you fit into the universe. View 1 comment. Jun 09, Michelle rated it liked it Shelves: This fortunately was NOT the first book I read on witchcraft.

I felt as if the whole time I was reading the book Buckland was telling me: If you're interested in traditional coven based witchcraft I suppose this book would serve yo "The Big Blue Book. If you're interested in traditional coven based witchcraft I suppose this book would serve you well. It was interesting to say the least, but for the average solitary practitioner I do not recommend it.

View all 4 comments. Oct 01, Zee rated it did not like it Shelves: This book was added to my reading list as a couple of wiccan sites I found which I believe were written by men, which will become important as I continue.

I have never had a good relationship with Christianity, so please be aware that anything using the word bible makes me incredibly uncomfortable. With the first cursory glance through th This book was added to my reading list as a couple of wiccan sites I found which I believe were written by men, which will become important as I continue. With the first cursory glance through the book I found several things that made me feel uncomfortable. First being the prevalence of naked ladies and the lack of corresponding gentlemen.

The image I felt summed up my thoughts on the matter was one of a young attractive lady harvesting herbs. She wears nothing, not even a protective glove, and we can see all of her, but have trouble seeing the herb she is cutting or how she is cutting it. I have no trouble with nudity, but can we all agree that when harvesting herbs, clothes might have a use?

However, with in the first sentence, Buckland makes his views very clear, stating that the Solitary Witch is a weak witch who cannot progress through witchcraft as they have no coven. A very elitist view that grated on my individualistic nature.

These are very strict patterns with little room for error or tweaking. He then goes on to describe a group sex act, with incredibly detail.

The male partner is the focus of this entire passage, with the female partner aiming to bring herself to orgasm at the same time as the male. Where sex Magick is to be worked this is especially important. He states that if pregnancy should be avoided Oral sex is an option, never mentioning condoms or any form of contraception. There is also a lovely quote from a Dr Mumford about the health benefits of imbibing semen… I preface this section with a few clarifying statements: I am asexual.

I can and do have sex, though I have a very low sex drive and I actually view sex as something apart from the intimacy of a loving relationship. The vague mention of same sex couples and those not wanting to take part in this bizarre ritual is frankly homophobic, inconsiderate and disgusting. If I did not already find this book repulsive, I would have had a very swift change of heart during this section. In conclusion, this book is a relic. Printed in , I feel this book was already behind the times at conception.

Buckland became a Gardnerian in the sixties, a time of rebellion, but he has stuck to the patriarchal, white supremacist rebellion: TLDR; this is the worst book for a beginner. It is sexist, homophobic and downright patronising. If you are starting out into witchcraft, this is the worst book choice possible.

Please avoid it! View all 3 comments. Jun 06, Jack rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I'll start by saying that I am not Wiccan.

Witchcraft Books

I've no real interest in Wicca anymore because it's become as lopsided as Christianity, but at the opposite end. But, "Uncle Buckey's Big Blue Book" is designed for someone who wants a serious, orderly, introductory study into the esoteric arts of the occult aka Wicca and a basic understanding of many of the celto-centric, reconstructionist pagan beliefs in practice today.

It is THE textbook with which to start. I have an earlier addition and I underst I'll start by saying that I am not Wiccan.

Best Witchcraft Books For Beginners

I have an earlier addition and I understand some of the criticisms I've brought up in another review have been addressed in the newer reprints. Buckland took a very methodical approach to teaching the magickal arts.

He presents a chapter, describes what you need to know and then has you write down answers to what you learned, your thoughts and impressions of what has just been taught, and the overall effectiveness of what you've done. In other words, he has you start your BOS properly. While there is some of the "you must do this" and the "you have to do that" within the book, it's not quite as bad as the contradictions in other almost-direct plagerizations of this work such as those taught by a certain "corvus corax metalic grey canis lupis" that contradict the teachings here as well as contradict what you've learned in a chapter previous Buckland's book, while not perfect and certainly preachy at points, is still the best starting point, along with the books by Cunningham.

Once you have read and utilized this book, you will understand the difference between CALLING yourself a pagan or what I call "fluffy-bunny" and actually understanding what it means to BE one. View 2 comments. Dec 14, Rosemary Bloom rated it it was ok Shelves: I have never really been into Gardnerian Wicca or the similar traditions, as far as adopting it as my personal system, and this book really encompasses all of the reasons why.

The ritual scourging, binding and blindfolding, the ceremonial feel to things, how the author gives you a way to do things and why and why others ways are wrong "but feel free to do whatever you like. He mentions that the best altar is a tree stump - but wouldn't that be benefiting from the killing of a tree? He continually mentions that being a solitary witch a witch who works alone "and often lives alone," in his words is sub-par and goes further to say that if you are not initiated into a tradition you are not actually a witch but a "cowan" or a similar word, I don't remember quite.

The circle must be this many feet wide - your wand must be this many inches; eh.

Not my thing. Also, the author really sounds super arrogant and self-serving - almost all of his sources are his own books! Jan 31, Jill rated it it was ok Shelves: A lot of it I skimmed over as his suggestions are not pertinent to how I practice, which is alone and clothed, nor did I listen to his suggestions on how to ruin my stove by making my own athame.

While I understand the magic and connection by making something yourself believe me, my passion is crafting and making things from scratch , metal working is not something I would suggest to a novice or anyone unfamiliar with crafting Feb.

While I understand the magic and connection by making something yourself believe me, my passion is crafting and making things from scratch , metal working is not something I would suggest to a novice or anyone unfamiliar with crafting or outside of a workshop area. I digress.

History section is laughable and worth skipping. Another annoyance was in his herb section. He mentions that a common medicine was extracted from foxglove, which was an herb used by village wise-women in days of yore. He also forgot to mention that foxglove can be highly poisonous and shouldn't really be used or ingested.

He didn't put it in his poisonous herb section either. I'm pretty irritated with his chapter on "Magick" chapter I feel like if I don't do it his way, then it's so obviously wrong. I don't feel that his way is right for me.

13 Books About Witches That'll Completely Change The Way You Think About Witchcraft

There is a little too much structure to his style and I'm a very "come as you are" person. There are sections that I find helpful, meditation being a big one as I have trouble with it.

But when it comes down to it, this isn't the beginner witchcraft book for me. I have to stop getting Wicca-influenced books, I think. May 12, Julia C. A dear friend and mentor who meant well gave me this book about 17 years ago when I was relatively new to the pagan path. Arin Murphy-Hiscocks The Green Witch is the perfect starter for those interested in magic based in the natural world, or those just watching from the sidelines.

As a single, teenage mother hopes to better herself through higher education in the '90s, she becomes the embodiment of a contemporary witch, which is to say, she holds within herself a power that frightens and challenges the culture surrounding her. Gathered in Hurston's hometown of Eatonville, Florida, this collection brings to life the magic, superstition, witchcraft and songs that form the Black Southern oral history. Sunny is Born in America, she and her family have returned to Nigeria.

She has albinism. Sunny is an outsider in every way - until she discovers she's in possession of latent magical powers, and finds belonging alongside three other students with the ability to shift reality. At the beginning of the 20th century, Ella has returned home to Jamaica, after fleeing an unsuccessful marriage in America.

Ella, who can pass for white, watched as her white husband put on a professional minstrel show based on her own childhood; in the aftermath, she has been "zombified," her ties with her Afro-Jamaican soul severed.

Witchcraft Book Lists

So her family turns to "myal," a religion which asserts that good can conquer all else. Taisia Kitaiskaia hits at the heart of the word "witch" — fearless individualism — by drawing connections between women writers, both well-known and obscure, and the history of Western witchcraft. Ready try your hand at some basic spells? Basic Witches will guide you through spells and incantations built for the modern world and modern problems, while contextualizing them within the history of "hell-raising" witches.

A witchcraft book for a beginner has to be easy to understand, well written, and introduce the reader to the topic. The following list has been created with 21 st century sensibilities in mind, and with care to ensure that everything on it is still in print and easily available. A classic and practical guide from Very useful for beginners who want to know and practice.

This little book, though no longer in print, can still be found in online bookstores and online libraries. Its approach is less elaborate than Mastering Witchcraft when it comes to things like inscribing magical tools, but it gives an excellent introduction to Astral, Natural, Moon, Elemental, and Planetary Magic. Although written with young people the age of in mind, this book is incredibly useful for adults as well. For those who want something less rigorous, more freeform, and who want to incorporate religion — specifically nature-oriented polytheism — into their practice, this book is a great place to learn both the basics of the Wiccan religion, and a gentle approach to magic.

This book combines the gentleness of Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner with some of the more intense sections of Mastering Witchcraft and The Prediction Book of Practical Magic , then adds a generous helping of humor and straight talk.

Why is a book by a druid on a witchcraft book list?

Because this book is an outstanding introduction to modern Paganism. Many, if not most, Pagans are refugees from Christianity, and the author himself is no exception, having been brought up as an evangelical Protestant. The chapter on magic is sensible and down to earth, yet uplifting at the same time. The entire book is delightfully thoughtful. This is not an exhaustive list by any means, but any of these witchcraft books will give a beginning witch an excellent start!

You may also be interested in metaphysical stores online. Contents 1 Best witchcraft books for beginners list 1. Recommendation No.

HOYT from Kansas
Review my other posts. I take pleasure in legends car racing. I am fond of reading comics coaxingly .