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THE LITTLE SCHEMER EBOOK

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Daniel P. Friedman. 1 Ungluer has Faved this Work. Learn more at Find on Google Books Find on OpenLibrary Find on GoodReads Find on. The little schemer / Daniel P. Friedman and Matthias Felleisen; drawings by For the student of Lisp programming, The Little LISPer can perform the same. The Little Schemer book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The notion that “thinking about computing is one of the most ex.


The Little Schemer Ebook

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The Little LISPer teaches you how to think in the LISP language an "The Little Schemer" introduces computing as an extension of arithmetic and algebra. With wit and wisdom, The Little LISPer unfolds some of the most beautiful concepts in The Little LISPer is self-contained: an interpreter for the language is. The notion that "thinking about computing is one of the most exciting things the human mind can do" sets both The Little Schemer (formerly known as The Little.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

This chapter offers some insight into how a computer handles the code you write for it, and building a working Scheme interpreter is deeply satisfying. Dec 29, Matt rated it it was amazing. The Little Schemer is geared toward luring you into first the syntax, then the concepts behind Scheme, recursion, and functional programming.

While probably of most interest to programmers or the mathematically inclined, the book claims to have been based off lecture notes for liberal arts students. The book has a very interesting dialog mechanism for teaching. After the introduction, there is little to nothing in the way of paragraphs of information.

It's been 11 years since I used Scheme and The Little Schemer caught me up with the basics quickly, with just a pen and a pad. It also illustrates continuations better than any site I've found on Google, and that alone was worth my time so far. Finally, the material is pretty dense and it may take more than one reading and some application! Dec 13, Mark rated it it was ok Shelves: The Little Schemer seems like a great book for a 12 year old grad student; that is to say, the style and the difficulty of the concepts in the book are somewhat at odds.

It ends up covering currying, the halting problem, multi-argument continuation passing hrm. It ends up covering currying, the halting problem, multi-argument continuation passing style, derivation of the applicative order y-combinator The Little Schemer may not be the best book for beginners, and I really think a modern introduction to recursion would be clearer in a language with algebraic data types and pattern matching instead of Scheme.

Too clever by half, and more cute than clear, I think. Aug 22, blake rated it it was amazing. Seriously, a famous book on Rails—perhaps considered the canonical book, it's so popular—epitomizes the awfulness of it all. How, you ask? Well, I went through said book and counted the number of things you had to learn in the first chapter and came up with a total 17! Only two of those were actually Ruby and Rails. The others were packaging tools, testing tools, clever DSLs for doing things like HTML that didn't actually relieve you of having to know HTML, and a great many of these things presented with the conceit, "Well, it's just like English so you know what it does.

Contrast now with The Little Schemer. It's not that this is an easy book. Despite being under pages in a friendly, sparse two-column format sprinkled with cartoons and loaded with food references, it can at times be brutal.

But that's not because it's overloading you with a bunch of unrelated material; it's because it's teaching you something very abstract and often rather challenging: I actually read through this in a short time because I wanted to read the The Reasoned Schemer and I didn't want to find myself struggling with the syntactic differences between Clojure and Scheme.

Even as someone who's been getting results out of FP for two years, in going through the exercises which you must, it's the whole point of the book , I found it necessary to take breaks and really chew on a few things. The point, though, is that this book tells you a little something, has you get used to the idea and the action of doing it, then it tells you a little something more. Then with all the little somethings, it builds to a new concept, a new action, a new set of little somethings.

There are ten commandments given, introduced as the concepts are introduced, then refined when the concepts are refined. Ultimately, though, all very simple, if not always, in the words of a certain Clojure creator, easy. What you don't find is anything that isn't functional programming. In fact, the main issue I had with the book was figuring out how and where to run the code.

Racket is a great choice, I discovered: There's a simple IDE called Dr. Racket that lets you write code, test code, and even step through code if you get stuck. I had a smaller problem with the "We're going to use a word without defining it precisely" approach—normally that's just "throw the book away" territory for me, and you'd be surprised how many books do this—but it's actually done well here: You're led to infer the meanings of these "undefined" terms through many examples.

Much like the "commandments", this means you get a definition for the word that works, then you get a refinement later on. It's very well done.

I wish I could say this heralded a sea change in the world of technical writing but, as it turns out, this book is an update actually considered the fourth edition! It's not really surprising: Modern books are geared toward "git 'er done". You don't learn how to web program here. You don't even learn how to read a file or print anything out.

You don't display any graphics or connect to the Internet. The final chapter here has you building a Lisp interpreter, which is pretty impressive for a page beginner book, but not "practical". But that stuff all changes, and none of those books will last for 40 years. None of them will change the way you think, either. But this book can, if you go through it. Feb 12, Andrew rated it really liked it Shelves: Thoroughly didactic, and a considerable brain twister, this book and its exercises did a great deal for my programming skills.

In particular, it furnishes stepping stones of a craft to decompose computing problems into recursive solutions. I found the last two chapters fiercely difficult, and cannot say that I truly retained them. However, I greatly enjoyed the opportunity to glimpse deeper mathematical aspects of the lambda calculus.

For anyone wishing to learn a lisp-like, I thorough recommend t Thoroughly didactic, and a considerable brain twister, this book and its exercises did a great deal for my programming skills.

For anyone wishing to learn a lisp-like, I thorough recommend time with this book, paper and pen, and a lisp interpretter Jul 13, Nathan rated it it was ok. This book is a series of questions geared towards helping the the reader learn the material by figuring out the answers. I think this book is best studied, rather than read, in short bites, taking plenty of time to understand each concept.

I'm finding I can get through 2 or 3 pages per sitting. The book builds on prior concepts to aid in understanding new concepts. Next I need to start reading 'An Introduc This book is a series of questions geared towards helping the the reader learn the material by figuring out the answers.

View 2 comments. Jul 31, Edwin rated it it was amazing. This is one of those books that changed me. By following a set of "commandments" presented in this book I learned to think clearly about functional programming, recursion and the Y-combinator. It also helped me ease into currying and other combinators like the S, K and I. After you read this book, you should read "To Mock a Mockingbird" and also start learning Haskell. The power of types in Haskell will one day compel you to understand the language of Category theory in mathematics, and after you This is one of those books that changed me.

The power of types in Haskell will one day compel you to understand the language of Category theory in mathematics, and after you figure out that, you will be enlightened.

Oct 13, Michael rated it really liked it Shelves: The Little Schemer is a classic computer science text and there are very good reasons for it: This is not a complete guide to Scheme as a programming language, it's a book about concepts. Highly recommended! Mar 17, Bharat rated it it was amazing. Easily one of the solid and neat introductory books to LISP. Going through this book allows people to think about programming in a new thinking way.

Dec 27, Subhrendu Sarkar rated it it was amazing. One of the best scheme books till date. Profoundly simple, easy and powerful. Hope all books can be this easy. Sep 19, Angus Fletcher rated it it was amazing.

Teaching entirely novel things is hard. Teaching a person to appreciate the need for something before that something has been given a name is even harder.

It's not done in undergraduate Java-school computer science. It's vital that we convey the jargon. Polymorphism, encapsulation and inheritance are definitions we're taught because we know that HR people who interview us will ask these questions. Clearly a strong indicator of computer programming acumen is the ability to spout the jargon, right Teaching entirely novel things is hard.

Clearly a strong indicator of computer programming acumen is the ability to spout the jargon, right? Blaise Pascal is credited with the following: It is one of the most beautiful technical books that I have ever read and here's why: Well, it starts out as a textbook that teaches lisp, a computer language, and ends up touching on some of the hits of theoretical computer science.

The Halting Problem, recursion, the Y-combinator. None of these things is named until after it is taught. What does this mean? It means that a concept isn't named until the student understands it through performance. Wait, how does a book make you perform? It's written in the style of a dialogue between student and teacher. You try to answer your teacher's question before they do themselves. Yeah but where's the performance there?

The Little Schemer

The best way to answer many of these questions is to write them down. Oh okay, so what kind of answers? After a fashion, mostly code. And you just write it down? Why not type it in? The book will tell you if you're on the right track.

So it's kind of like a REPL but on paper then?

The Little Schemer, Fourth Edition

Yeah, sort of, which means you train your own brain as a lisp interpreter. That sounds hard. It is a little, but you always know exactly where you get stuck so you can go back and read over the last few questions again. Well geez, that sounds amazing.

It's maybe the best programming book I've ever read. Where do I get it? There are some PDFs or you can buy it off amazon. Once you've ordered that, have a peanut butter and banana sandwich.

You've earned it. Mar 10, Gaelan D'costa rated it really liked it Shelves: Reader response, freshly finished: Unsure how I feel about this book. I really love the didactic style. I found it easy to keep pace. It taught Scheme in a really digestible way At least, I think it stopped being that digestible by the end.

As someone who knows Scheme and understands the concepts reasonably well , I found slowing down to be difficult, and I also didn't feel the book convinced me why I'd go through the contortions the latter half of the book made me go through.

With my "non-programmer" hat on, I was willing to take the leaps of faith required in the first half of the book while it immediately paid off, by about "Shadows" I stopped seeing why I was learning what I was learning. The authors were being too cute or maybe holding onto too much for the sequel "The Seasoned Schemer" Anyone who wants to teach someone programming concepts would do well to learn this book and encourage the use of a REPL. It's a great book for someone who understands programming languages, PL theory, and PL concepts to learn how to teach them to others in an approachable way.

I'd like to see how someone who has no idea or agenda for learning how to program would do with this book. I feel most people would really benefit from the first half and then get frustrated by the second. Mar 25, Alice rated it it was amazing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

The Little Schemer

To view it, click here. A strange book. A truly strange one. It is not a reference book also. But it is a book that gently drags you into understanding. Someone told me it teaches to think recursively - oh yeah, that it does. I think. Can't be sure really. I didn't actually do any examples well, only in my head , just read through it, and it was good even like that. The most valuable thing about The Little Schemer is that it feels like an enthralling journ A strange book. The most valuable thing about The Little Schemer is that it feels like an enthralling journey into the oceans of awesomeness.

Especially when you get to the applicative order Y combinator. Took me about 2 hours to get how it works though again without doing any examples and without even pen and paper as the book suggests - didn't have the chance then, was reading basically while walking , but that was epic. Jan 07, Jack rated it it was ok. I really wanted to like this book, alas it was not for me. I was looking for a deep, philosophical computer science book using scheme.

The book makes seems to have two assumptions: You already are somewhat familiar with scheme. You do not know what recursion is. Of course, if you have any familiarity with scheme then you are likely quite familiar with recursion. I already knew scheme but can imagine someone coming to it with no background being a bit confused when terms are given with no expl I really wanted to like this book, alas it was not for me.

I already knew scheme but can imagine someone coming to it with no background being a bit confused when terms are given with no explanation. I gave up on the book but it appears to just take a really, really long time to explain recursion to you. I would be fine with this if it did it in a beautiful, philosophical manner. Perhaps many others see it that way. I unfortunately did not.

Again, I really want to like this book as so many people seem to get enjoyment from it. I give it points for style - the whole book is a series of questions and answers and does have a style - just not one that I particularly liked. I did not finish all of the book. Perhaps I missed the best parts.

Jan 16, Robert Postill rated it it was amazing Shelves: It's difficult to express how interesting this book is. The format is a set of questions and answers, which is initially quite an odd read. However as the book unfolds you begin not only to appreciate the book's quirky style but also the power of the lessons contained within the book.

It is a testament to the power of the material that by the last chapter you have sculpted a scheme interpreter from the bones of some really simple functions at the start of the book. In fact what this book demonst It's difficult to express how interesting this book is. In fact what this book demonstrates is the awesome power of recursion. There are some things that you're not going to get from reading this book.

For instance there is no discussion of scheme's place in the world of programming languages or any work on data structures. But then there a large number of other books that touch just those subjects yet do a poor job of discussing recursion. This book is a gem, buy it and understand that behind the odd format is great power.

You might well need to buy more programming books but this one is must-have to understand recursion. Sep 26, Koen Crolla rated it it was ok Shelves: I expected to enjoy this a lot more than I did.

If you're looking to learn Scheme but don't have any experience with it whatsoever—and especially if you don't have any experience programming at all—this book will be near worthless to you.

If you already have some experience but would like to flesh it out a bit more, like I did, its gimmicks will get on your nerves really quickly. The Little Schemer spends a tremendous amount of time focussing on trivialities while skipping over far too many funda I expected to enjoy this a lot more than I did. The Little Schemer spends a tremendous amount of time focussing on trivialities while skipping over far too many fundamentals and important not-so-fundamentals.

It doesn't teach you any usable Scheme but somehow still manages to teach bad habits, and it makes the whole language look more convoluted and less interesting than it actually is. This edition immediately tries to sell you The Seasoned Schemer at the end, and it's possible the two books combine to form something non-useless.

I don't intend to find out. Jan 10, Sophia rated it really liked it Shelves: Then I found this book. It is a spoonful yes in the sense of Food of Scheme, a flavor of Lisp.

First and last impression: Lisp IS abstract. People are right. It can be practical but, this is purely abstract. It does not feel like a programming language, not like any of the languages I know, but some mathematical syntaxes. It defines primitive functions then builds more complicated ones on top of them using recursions.

Recursions after recursions. I've never been exposed to so many recursions, not so many even in the recursion section of algorithm exercises. Tell me Scheme is all about recursions and lamdas I'll buy it.

This book does not cover macros, the magic of Lisp. I'd love to learn more about it when I get to the point. Dec 27, Dmitri rated it it was amazing Shelves: What a wonderful little book! While other books will tell you the mechanics of LISP, they can leave you largely uninformed on the style of problem-solving for which LISP is optimized. Daniel P. Friedman and David Thrane Christiansen.

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