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GUESTS OF THE SHEIK PDF

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Guests of the Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village [Elizabeth Warnock Fernea] on cittadelmonte.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. A delightful. Editorial Reviews. Review. There are million Muslims in the world today, yet Islam is one of the world's least understood and appreciated religions. Book Reviews. The fact that this is a historical and not “anthropological” work, however, cannot absolve the author from a number of noit sequiturs in the.


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A delightful, well-written, and vastly informative ethnographic study, this is an account of Fernea's two-year stay in a tiny rural village in Iraq, where. Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy A critical Analysis and Reading of Guests of the Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village Introduction Guests of the Sheik brings into. Elizabeth Warnock Fernea. Fernea, Elizabeth Warnock, -- Add tags for "Guests of the Sheik.".

Skip to main content. Log In Sign Up. A critical Analysis and Reading of Guests of the Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village. Khaled Al-Quzahy.

While the Sheik is invited to dine with Mr. Bob, she deals with situation as if she is in front of a great challenge to prove her ability to be just like those women in the village. She hardly could introduce herself to the Sheik in few minutes in shy walks. Fernea mostly adopted every oriental style in living to be able to understand people more and more and wanting not to be seen odd in the village.

A very important thing in this interesting ethnography is how some oriental traditions became reasonable for Fernea. The veil and abaya protect females and do not necessarily handicap them or control their mobility. Those religious rituals became ordinary for her as she knew why they are held.

She no longer protest against women segregation from men as she knows, now, that women themselves have no protest against that. Fernea, with time discovers the societal norms of that community and becomes sure of how to deal with those things well; when being invited she knows men go to dine with men and women go to be in the harem.

She became interested in discovering new things about the life of people in that village. Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy especially after feeling that she was not in a good connection with them at her first days. Thus, the only way was to be accustomed to the life style of those women. She understood how to do that. She also learnt the familial and social codes of this polygamous patriarchal Figure 1 Elizabeth Warnock Fernea pictured wearing traditional tribal women's dress of the southern society.

She had to wear the Euphrates area. The headscarf with fringe is the asha, veil and abaya as shown in the chin scarf is the footta. These garments are worn under the abaya or outer cloak Photo: She was shocked that her American styles of living were not approved by women in this village. Not only the practical difficulties of continuing the visiting and maintaining good relations bothered me.

It had now become important to me to be accepted by these people as 4 Elizabeth Fernea, Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy a woman and as a human being. And tonight, when I had thought success was near, the evening had turned into a fiasco. I was indignant first, and told myself they were nothing but a group of curiosity seekers. Then I began to feel righteous. After all they had insulted me by refusing my tea, spitting out my food, and telling me I was lazy and a bad cook.

I felt hurt. They did not find my sympathetic or interesting or even human, but only amusing as performing a member of another species. I tried to feel tragic, superior, and ironic, above it all-but failed utterly and wept again.

She says: Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy The above paragraphs tell us how Fernea managed her relations with women in the village in order to get information about these people and life there. She needed that information to help her husband in his anthropological work for his doctorate degree and to write her ethnography about this Iraqi village.

As an observer she compares what she knows as an American with that which she found in El Nahra. However, her ethnography is so specific in its details.

Guests of the Sheik

Fernea learnt a lot of the work of her husband on how to record her notes at nights while helping him gathering information and telling him all the details of events that she had passed at that day. Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy exigencies and circumstances involved in any instance that is recorded. Millet sketch-map of El Nahra shown in figure 2 and also introduces the reader to all the characters she mentions in her book.

Before starting her ethnography, she shows the reader the complicated family structure of the polygamous families. At the end of the book, she supplies us with a glossary of the Arabic terms she used while writing.

McNabb uses David M. The description may be of a small tribal group in an exotic land or a classroom in middle-class suburbia. She liked while writing to make sure of every remark done, its reasons and its history, if has any.

Fetterman, Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy However, because of the sexes segregation she lived away from men, her informants are only her male Servant Mohammed, with whom she can talk and her husband. Most of her information came out of the women of the village. This means a certain deficiency in the information she might have brought. Gender Relationship in the Islamic Shiite El-Nahra Through a feminist perspective, one can notice this writing as an evidence of two things; firstly Fernea was obliged to take most of her information from women in the village.

Secondly, her book focuses mostly on women life and female roles in this Shiite village. The community of men, where decisions are made and where life is planned in general. The second community is of women who seem in most of the story content of their life under complete dominance of men and absolute obedience.

The segregation of both sexes had a very bad effect on Fernea at her arrival, but as she understood the societal codes of this village she had to abide by those roles. She even seems convinced of that seclusion.

For the West, too, had a blind spot in this area. I could tell my friends in America again and again that the veiling and seclusion of Eastern women did not mean necessarily that they were forced against their will to live lives of submission and near- serfdom17 She also, as an American observer, had a also, as an American observer, had a certain inner conflict of ideas.

Women are not but workers at houses, children bearers, mothers or wives. Their role is simply restricted inside the harem. In the third and fourth part of Guests of the Sheik, Fernea makes a comparison between women of the village and those of the city. She says that women 17 Ibid.

Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy in city seem to have more privilege than those of the village. They are more educated and more liberated. Laila, the daughter of the sheik, would be killed by her male family members if they knew she went with the company of a foreigner.

What Fernea highlights here is the complete gender roles and customs. What they could do-sew, cook. Clean, make a man comfortable- they did better than anyone else. Fernea studied reasons of these norms. She eventually understands that though religious values of Islam have the strongest effect on these norms and attitudes, such gender roles and sexes separations are traditionally and socially constructed.

To conclude this part, Elizabeth Fernea focuses mostly on how women are mistreated. Regardless of the fact that these women are content or no, she represents them as lacking to know what their rights are.

She talks about issues of mobility, dress codes virginity, polygamy, segregation and submission. Men can marry one or more at any time whereas there would be women who can not marry at all because they can not get married to men from 21 Ibid, p. Khaled Ali Al-Quzahy outside the tribe or may be the family. But, she does not criticize that. In other words, she is quite effective in dispelling the myth that women who wear the abaya must be weak and passive.

From having spent years in the Middle East, I know that many Arab women regard the veil as a garment that protects and provides anonymity rather than one that hinders and robs them of equal rights.

Best of all, the author has shown us that no matter the cultural differences between people, each one of us wants the same things in the endto be happy, to be well, to do good, to have good friends and so on. Regardless of the different religious rituals processions found in this book, and forgetting about how they are different from those of Sunni group, Fernea reflects the way women are still treated in many parts of the Middle East and I might make a similarity with my own village in Yemen, where I find a great resemblance of how women think and are treated.

That stereotyping of Orientals has made them exotic, erotic and dehumanized nations. Elizabeth Warnock Fernea Find more information about: Elizabeth Warnock Fernea.

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Fernea, Elizabeth Warnock, -- View all subjects. Similar Items. Master and use copy. Digital Library Federation, December A great window into Iraqi culture and history. View 1 comment. Jan 05, Elizabeth rated it it was amazing Shelves: An excellent perhaps out-of-print book about an Arab sheikh and his clan in southern Iraq. Written in the seventies by the wife of an American anthropologist, who went on to become an outstanding enthnographer in her own right, this remains one of the best inside accounts of authentic Iraqi family life and culture.

(PDF Download) Guests of the Sheik: An Ethnography of an Iraqi Village PDF

Well worth hunting down. Sep 26, Regina Lindsey rated it really liked it. I love history. I love politics. I love current events. There were two seminal events that influenced that love. The Iranian hostage crisis was one of those two events. During those days I was glued to the TV watching every unfolding moment that related to the attempts to resolve the crisis and the upcoming election. Lately, I've been reminded that I view those incidents through the lens of a pre-teen and wanted to delve into a study to understand the context more.

On November 4, , I love history. Bowden, also author of Black Hawk Down provides excellent context on the US-Iranian relations twenty-five years prior to this incident, the factions competing for power within Iran at the time, details on the behind-the-scenes negotiations to release the hostages, mecahnisms the hostages employed to survive the ordeal, the role the press played, how American citizens developed ways individually and collectively to support the hostages, how this incident changed the trajectory of Iranian history, and how Iranians today view those days.

Some of the things I learned: Some of the students atended Berkeley at a time that student demonstrations were impacting the view Americans held on the Vietnma War. Returning home these students employed many of the same strategies, assuming American citizens would have a similar resonse "once they learned the truth about American involvement in Iran.

Even today we hear about Iranian misinterpretation of historical facts i. It was amazing to see just how many other areas of history are skewed. I was suprised to learn how many marines were on site and not allowed to defend the embassy.

Even though there is blatant bias discussed more n a moment on Bowden's part, I felt like I had a much better understanding of the severe missteps by Carter administration in the months leading up to November, the missteps in the decision making process during the crisis, and why the Shah's medical treatment in the US was such an issue. I'm not so sure I have a better understanding of the missteps in the rescue attempt, as Bowden seems to go against every other historian's view on this point.

How the Russian invasion of Afghanistan and the war with Iraq influenced the negotiations and release of the hostages.

Bowden's overt bias kept me from rating this a 5 star book. Actually I'd rather the bias be this evident because it is then easy to separate fact from opinion; however, I still cannot bring myself to give a wok on history 5 stars when the author tries to push an agenda. View all 3 comments. Mar 23, Louise rated it really liked it Shelves: A thoroughly absorbing, well-written novel.

Elizabeth Fernea's entertaining account of her time spent in El Nahra in southern Iraq during the 's, is uniquely insightful. Settling in a new land, learning the language and culture, the ways of the people, and hoping to be accepted would be frightening for anyone. Fernea handled herself with grace and humility and was quickly befriended by the women of El Nahra. The descriptive narrative left me feeling, hearing, seeing and smelling the sites and A thoroughly absorbing, well-written novel.

The descriptive narrative left me feeling, hearing, seeing and smelling the sites and sounds of El Nahra. I felt as though I knew well, the women Elizabeth had made friends with. I was very interested in learning the words in Arabic and enjoyed looking them up in the glossary at the back of the book.

This was an excellent, excellent story that I plan on sharing with a friend. Jan 18, Mark Klempner rated it it was amazing. There is a great dramatic irony present when reading this book now. The lovely, stable way of life that they maintained may have been deeply flawed from our Western point of view, but no one can deny it i There is a great dramatic irony present when reading this book now.

The lovely, stable way of life that they maintained may have been deeply flawed from our Western point of view, but no one can deny it is is better than the chaos and hardship that has replaced it. As the back cover says, this ethnography is exceptionally well written and is an eye-opening account for anyone who has been watching CNN et al for years without ever getting a true glimpse as to the actual fabric of traditional Iraqi society.

May 22, Andrew rated it really liked it Shelves: This was assigned in one of my anthropology courses back in college. I think of it as my second wake up call to the reality of life in a Muslim culture and environment.

Guests of the Sheik by Elizabeth Warnock Fernea | cittadelmonte.info: Books

As an ethnography I remember it being very personalized, almost more like a travelogue. One of the parts that affected me the most and still creates a lot of my weltanschung of Muslim culture was a discussion about how in places like America aging parents are often put in nursing homes, a fact that was extremely shocking to the w This was assigned in one of my anthropology courses back in college.

One of the parts that affected me the most and still creates a lot of my weltanschung of Muslim culture was a discussion about how in places like America aging parents are often put in nursing homes, a fact that was extremely shocking to the women.

Why would they not be brought home and looked after? The scene in the book is still one of the biggest lessons I've had on cultural relativism.

Oct 24, Gina Wilkinson rated it really liked it Shelves: First published in , this book is still studied today and for good reason. The title says it's an ethnography, so I was expecting it to be dry, but it seemed more like a memoir to me, and richer for that.

The author, newly-wed American Elizabeth Fernea, lived in a small Iraqi village for two years with her anthropologist husband in the late 's, and this book chronicles her observations and experiences. I lived in Iraq myself, and was not surprised to see that the local women welcomed the First published in , this book is still studied today and for good reason. I lived in Iraq myself, and was not surprised to see that the local women welcomed the author into their lives.

I loved the insight into traditional life during that period, and the nuanced way that the author portrayed the women in the village, their unique personalities, sense of humor, and relationships. Mar 27, Karen rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a re-read for me, and I am so glad I read it again, I had forgotten so much. Elizabeth and her husband Bob move to an Iraqi village, soon after they are married so that Bob can do some research for his Doctorate.

They have been invited to live in the compound of the local Sheik in El-Nahra. Although they will be living in a small guest house, most of their time will be spent separated during the day; Bob with the men, Elizabeth with the women. The Sheik's family live in the strict Shiit This was a re-read for me, and I am so glad I read it again, I had forgotten so much.

The Sheik's family live in the strict Shiite way.

This is basically Elizabeth's memoir of their time in the village, but I would have loved to have heard more of Bob's side. It is dated, the book took place in , and it was printed in Overall, I felt this was a good view into the lives of rural Iraqi village. Dec 16, Sabreen rated it really liked it. I think this book is great, most of the time the author maintains a culturally relative perspective.

Its great that a woman was able to write it. Many of the traditions and values of the Iraqis in the small village are portrayed adequately, however this novel is an ethnography so it depicts things through one persons view. And the religious aspects of it our very vivid. I enjoyed this book a lot and think its worth reading. You will learn a lot about the culture. This is not a generalization of I think this book is great, most of the time the author maintains a culturally relative perspective.

This is not a generalization of Iraq, its detailed and very informative as well as interesting. The characters go into depth too. Although at some points BJ offers an ethnocentric viewpoint. Not every culture is the same, so be sure to remember that there is no right way to anything. Oct 29, Weavre rated it really liked it Shelves: Picked up at a yard sale when I was still a kid, this book is one of several that undoubtedly contributed to my interest in learning about life in other cultures, about the incredible range of human experience.

I still have it, and still remember it--which speaks well for it! While the world described in these pages has now passed into history, it's worth reading both to understand the possibilities of a different cultural structure and to understand the lifestyle of a previous generation, now re Picked up at a yard sale when I was still a kid, this book is one of several that undoubtedly contributed to my interest in learning about life in other cultures, about the incredible range of human experience.

While the world described in these pages has now passed into history, it's worth reading both to understand the possibilities of a different cultural structure and to understand the lifestyle of a previous generation, now remembered wistfully by so many people in the modern Middle East.

How can we hope to understand what the most frustrated of the people there want, if we don't understand the cultural memory of what they want to restore, or the foundations through which they were shaped?

Feb 02, Holly Celeste rated it it was amazing. This book was assigned reading for one of my women's studies courses in college. I loved it. The author's husband is in Iraq on business, and she spends the time there living with the women and learning about the differences and similarities of their cultures. She is great at reserving judgment. Where she is horrified that they must hide their hair and limit their travel, they are equally horrified that she is so far from her mother and has virtually no jewelry.

It made a strong impression on This book was assigned reading for one of my women's studies courses in college. It made a strong impression on me then, during the first Gulf War.

I'd love to re-read it Ah well. Apr 09, Heather rated it really liked it Shelves: I thought this was a very readable account of an American woman's two year stay in an Iraqi village in the mids. Of course, much of what she described is probably very dated now, but I thought the author did a fairly good job of providing a glimpse into the life and culture of women in the village at that time.

In the end, it is a tale of friendship across strong cultural differences and I thought it was written from an interesting perspective.

Admittedly, I have not read many personal acco I thought this was a very readable account of an American woman's two year stay in an Iraqi village in the mids. Admittedly, I have not read many personal accounts of this kind so my basis for comparison is fairly limited.

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