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ALISTAIR MACLEAN BREAKHEART PASS EBOOK

Friday, February 22, 2019


Breakheart Pass by Alistair MacLean; 8 editions; First published in DAISY for print-disabled Download ebook for print-disabled (DAISY). After the Civil War, an army relief train takes supplies to an Indian fort, and its passengers suffer mysterious accidents. Breakheart Pass is a novel by Scottish author Alistair MacLean (), first published in . Create a book · Download as PDF · Printable version.


Alistair Maclean Breakheart Pass Ebook

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Editorial Reviews. Review. 'Explodes with action' The Mirror. 'Alistair MacLean is a magnificent . Now that Mr. MacLean's books are almost all available in ebook form, it would be great to add every volume to my Kindle - but with the quality. A magnificent tale of heart-stopping suspense from the highly acclaimed master of the cittadelmonte.info Rocky Mountains, Winter One of the most desolate stret. Read "Breakheart Pass" by Alistair MacLean available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first purchase. A magnificent tale of heart-stopping.

With an OverDrive account, you can save your favorite libraries for at-a-glance information about availability. Find out more about OverDrive accounts. Alistair MacLean, the son of a minister, was brought up in the Scottish Highlands. In he joined the Royal Navy. After the war he read English at Glasgow University and became a teacher. Two and a half years spent aboard a wartime cruiser gave We want your feedback!

Oddly, at times appropriately, the hard casing was worth more than the flimsy strip that contained the data. This massive cassette slipped inside that box of metal, often getting stuck, which in turn was hooked to your television set--not that sleek and slim apparatus in your living room, bedroom, washroom, etc. Most of you are probably laughing at my wild fantasy, but this was reality back in those dark ages.

One evening before supper my mom ushered me out of the house to pick up a movie. My brother didn't want to come and the pressure to find a good film gripped me during that ten-minute walk to our video rental store. Yes, this was a dark era when to watch a movie at home you had to first leave the house. I dreaded the chore, knowing that if I picked a bad film my mom, being a film lover, and my brother, being an older brother, would never let me hear the end of it.

Days it seemed I searched those shelves of videocassette boxes for something we all would enjoy, until my eye was caught by a photo of Charles Bronson covered in western garb hanging from a train overlooking a ravine. Fans of MacLean consider Breakheart Pass to be among the oddest of his novels, and it flopped on its initial release.

A later MacLean work, it focuses as usual primarily on action and plot, but is his first novel set in the American West.

It deals with a motley crew of white gun-runners, US Army soldiers and Paiute Indians, rather than his normal array of spies, soldiers and other evildoers. I have little opinion on all this since I haven't read any of MacLean's work prior to this one. Wanting to have a go at popular authors I've been ignoring, MacLean came to mind, and it's my memory of the film that peaked my interest in the novel.

Though it's been twenty-plus years, I recall quite a bit about the movie, and I enjoyed it at the time, which is a lot more than I can say about the novel. Yes, even the train. The problems are many, but really what killed it for me was MacLean's unfair treatment of information and the all-too uninteresting tough-guy hero John Deakin.

Information appears to be revealed at the most convenient of times. Hey reader, he seems to be saying, this is gonna be cool.

Breakheart Pass

Perhaps this mess is the result of an attempt to make us feel as though we too are on that chaotic train, but it's most likely the consequence of rushed writing and laziness. The novel is written so haphazardly and with such unbelievable lines as "She gave him a look as cold as ice," that I doubt MacLean spent too much time in the composition, or perhaps this quick straightforward and unimaginative style was his bid for the contract to write the screenplay, which was eventually offered to him.

As for Deakin he is a man of few words, but his few words are so vacuous and expected that it would have been better had he been mute. He comes across as abrasive and unpleasant, and the film producers lucked out in nabbing the abrasive yet far more charming tough guy Bronson to take on the role.

On paper Deakin is too clever both for the plot and the reader, concocting not too exciting methods of escaping the train and dealing with the evildoers, methods he keeps to himself and, well, keeps to everyone but the reader, saying things like "I've got a plan" fittingly at the end of the chapter, allowing the author to jump to another scene at the opening of the next chapter and leaving us in the dark.

And what Deakin comes up with usually consists of blowing something up. The opening was a little slow but half-way through I was quite into it, soon losing interest and speeding through the rest so quickly that I had to pause and wait for the train to catch up with me before I could go on. Finally I was done, and had to face that final pitiful exchange between Deakin and Marica.

Sadly I'm left to wonder if re-watching the movie would kill that twenty-something year memory of a "good" film. I've been a big fan of Alistair MacLean's ever since I read all of his earlier, i. Well, the short answer is really frickin' horrible ; although if that's not enough, t I've been a big fan of Alistair MacLean's ever since I read all of his earlier, i.

Well, the short answer is really frickin' horrible ; although if that's not enough, the somewhat longer answer follows: For the first half of the book I honestly couldn't recall if I'd read it before - despite the Western setting, the characters and predictable plot twists were so familiar from MacLean's earlier stories that it almost read as a parody of his own work.

MacLean was always at his best writing in the first person, but this third-person narrative is particularly grating. Much of that is probably due to his patented British suave-cum-flippant tone sounding wildly off key in this setting and historical period; but I suspect a lot was also due to what is generally seen as his overall mid-career slump into sloppiness.

Consider the following random samples: Pearce wasn't demonstrably happy, but he certainly couldn't have been described as ebullient. For every man aboard those coaches, death must have supervened instantaneously. Claremont manfully quelled what was clearly an incipient attack of apoplexy. Deakin staggered and sat down heavily then, after a few seconds during which the other men averted their faces in shame for lost manhood, dabbed some blood from a split lip.

Fairchild spoke weightily in his impressively gubernatorial manner. He ignited the tube of blasting powder, judged his moment to what he regarded as a nicety, then tossed it out the opening. Good guys, bad guys, Indians - all sound similar and generally British, "We don't want any of those nasty ricochets flying about inside the cab," or in the case of the really bad Indian, positively Confucian "in weather such as this, the wise man does not linger".

We also get exchanges like this: But chances we cannot take. Luckily, I don't think I've reread The Guns of Navarone since the 60's - and so will add that to my to-read list, just so that I can end my half century relationship on an up note. Because quite frankly, other than that, further chances I cannot take. Feb 28, George K. Apr 08, Laura Verret rated it really liked it Shelves: But when Pearce arrests a man — John Deakin — who is guilty of crimes against the people and the army, Claremont grudgingly allows them onto his train.

But who amongst the tiny group of passengers would have such nefarious plans? And what exactly is awaiting the train in Fort Humboldt?

Oh, sure, the characters are shaken up and rearranged for our pleasure, but the stakes and setting are cogent. The hero is a little cavalier in his approach to killing his enemies. I do believe that if another person is trying to take your life you are justified in using lethal force to defend yourself, but MacLean portrays human life as a tad too expendable. Visit The Blithering Bookster to read more reviews!

Aug 23, Fiona Akkerman rated it it was ok Shelves: Cluttered with adverbs and entertaining a somewhat predictable plot, with thin and stereotypical characters and poor dialogue, it reads like a first draft typos included , and a sad one at that. Aug 09, Liora rated it really liked it Shelves: The train, under the command of Colonel Claremont, is full of relief troops and supplies, headed to Fort Humboldt, a remote mountain fort in Paiute Indian territory.

The train also has on board a Marshall who is escorting a captured Federal prisoner named John Dekin. On its journey, there will be murders, conspiracies, sabotage, ambushes, rooftop fights, and Indians seeking revenge. The action is non-stop, and at times it is somewhat hectic, with one plot twist after another. My only complaint is that a whole lot of characters are introduced at the beginning of the book, and without much character description, it was difficult for me to keep them straight for awhile.

Basically, this book is all about action and suspense, and it does an excellent job of delivering both. Feb 05, Jayanth rated it really liked it Shelves: An entertaining thriller.

Almost every scene is tense from start to finish. A part of the book is a brilliant whodunnit and then it's out and out action. It's my first time reading a novel with a western american setting, you know, saloon bars, gunslingers, etc.

This is also my first time reading Alistair MacLean and I like his writing style. Going to read more of his books if they promise the same amount of thrilling action all through the book. Jul 23, Lenny Husen rated it really liked it.

This was fun, and I can see why it was made into a movie. The female character was less weak than MacLean's usual useless beauties and actually helped the situation. I couldn't put it down. Jul 22, Stacy rated it liked it. Alistair MacLean is my favorite spy novelist from the s and s.

Although this one, veers off into new territory by taking place after the civil war. Still suspenseful and exciting. Still fun.

Very nostalgic. Good Yarn Some minor inconsistencies here and there, probably due to Mr.

Breakheart Pass by Alistair MacLean

MacLean being English. But a fun read with some twists and turns. The book also spawned a rarely decent film. Apr 05, Al Datum rated it it was amazing.

I always wanted to read MacLean's Western novel.

I was not disappointed. But whereas I expected some straight up fight sort of like a Die Hard style of book , it was far more intricate than that. A cholera outbreak is causing soldiers to sicken and die, and the relief train is hurryi I always wanted to read MacLean's Western novel.

A cholera outbreak is causing soldiers to sicken and die, and the relief train is hurrying to bring needed medicine. But as the train makes its way into the mountains, people start to disappear and die. And everyone is clearly not what they seem. At the fort is Sepp Calhoun, a notorious outlaw being returned for trial. But even in the fort, things aren't what they appear to be.

This book has all the important elements. Excitement and intrigue, some really good fight scenes, crisp dialog, a really interesting setting, and a plot that keeps you guessing until the very end.

I really loved this book and would highly recommend it to anyone seeking a solid western or an espionage novel in the best tradition of Alistair MacLean Oct 19, Richard rated it really liked it Shelves: I enjoyed this one far more than any of these probably because I particularly like historic novels based in the 19th Century. This one is set in on a steam train travelling across the Rockies in the deep west of USA.

Apart from Clive Cussler's Isaac Bell series, I don't think I've read a book of this specific genre, albeit Cussler's books are set slightly later in time. The author's writing is superb, as always.

The characters are all well described and you can easily picture them in your head, always a good sign. The plot is great, involving a wide range of both renegades and good guys, not to mention the red indians.

If you like this period of American History, this is definitely worth a read. Feb 27, Tyler Cole rated it liked it Shelves: The story starts with a troop train traveling through the Rocky Mountains in the winter of with a destination of a remote Army outpost in Nevada that is supposedly plagued with cholera. On the train are relief troops, medical supplies, other provisions and a wanted outlaw in the custody of a United States Marshal.

Once the train gets underway, everything changes. The story takes several twists and turns filled with action and adventure. No one, with the exception of few, are what they appea The story starts with a troop train traveling through the Rocky Mountains in the winter of with a destination of a remote Army outpost in Nevada that is supposedly plagued with cholera. No one, with the exception of few, are what they appear to be.

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It can be a little unbelievable at times, but the superb writing skills of Alistair MacLean makes this an enjoyable read. Feb 21, Ibrahim rated it it was ok Shelves: MacLean is a mixed author for me, with some books I love, and some books I hate, and this is one that occupies the middle space, so it's OK as a quick, cheap read when you're on a long car ride or something; otherwise, Breakheart Pass isn't special, and quickly forgettable.

It has some nice dialogue, but I just felt that the characters were all rather flat and undeveloped. Please visit my blog for more Reviews, Parent Guide MacLean is a mixed author for me, with some books I love, and some books I hate, and this is one that occupies the middle space, so it's OK as a quick, cheap read when you're on a long car ride or something; otherwise, Breakheart Pass isn't special, and quickly forgettable.

Please visit my blog for more Reviews, Parent Guides, and Chapters of my own book: Jun 27, Mark Borchers rated it really liked it. How could a Scotsman possible write a decent Western? I was dubious, and therefore my critical faculties were on hair trigger as I read through the first couple of chapters of the book.

Nevertheless, I became more and more absorbed in this suspenseful tale of a train ride through wintry wilderness to an Army fort stricken with illness. Something is amiss, someone is not what they seem, and MacLean is such a master of plot that you can't figure out how it's going to end.

Yep, I'm recommending peo How could a Scotsman possible write a decent Western? Yep, I'm recommending people read this western by a Scot. You'll enjoy it. Going back to an old favorite, yes, finally something fun and exciting to read. Not perfect: I knew whom the hero was from the start, I sensed whom at least one of the villains was early, but unpredictable enough that the two characters I thought were villains because they were so over the top were not.

No deep characters, all playing a role. Little long of a stream to get to the ultimate motive. Some non creativity: MacLean used the name of the Indians and the snow topped roofs in other books.

B Going back to an old favorite, yes, finally something fun and exciting to read. But fun, exciting, easy to read, unlike so much I've read lately, so 4 stars. A magnificent tale of heart-stopping suspense from the highly acclaimed master of the genre. The Rocky Mountains, Winter ?

One of the most desolate stretches of railroad in the West. Travelling along it is a crowded troop train, bound for the cholera-stricken garrison at Fort Humboldt. On board are the Governor of Nevada, the daughter of the fort? Between them and safety are the hostile Paiute Indians? Fiction Suspense Thriller. Publication Details Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers Imprint: HarperCollins Publication Date: More about Alistair MacLean.

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