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Swimming Books Pdf

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It is my great pleasure to introduce you this “Swimming for All,. Swimming for Life – Learn how to swim, the basics” Manual, as part of. FINA's global effort in the. The present book presents the origins and the latest history of swimming, the stages of its development into a competitive sport and highlights its outstanding. As both a swimmer and a coach, I have seen how . The Mental Prep for Swim Racing Guide Book (pdf) - A description of the theory and.

Swimming drills for every stroke. Guzman, Ruben J. G89 Except for use in a review, the reproduction or utilization of this work in any form or by any electronic, mechanical, or other means, now known or hereafter invented, including xerography, photocopying, and recording, and in any information storage and retrieval system, is forbidden without the written permission of the publisher. Acquisitions Editor:

Acquisitions Editor: Jana Hunter Developmental Editors: Laura Koritz and Cory Weber Copyeditor: Joanna Hatzopoulos Portman Proofreader: Erin Cler Graphic Designer: Robert Reuther Graphic Artist: Tara Welsch Cover Designer: Andrew Tietz Art Managers: Tim Offenstein and Roberto Sabas Printer: Sheridan Books Human Kinetics books are available at special discounts for bulk purchase.

Special editions or book excerpts can also be created to specication. Human Kinetics P. Box Champaign, IL e-mail: To achieve the most success possible in your swimming career, you must work hard not only in training but also in improving your technique.

Rening and perfecting technique is a never-ending process. Age-group swimmers, senior swimmers, and elite swimmers alike must continually work on the prociency of their strokes in order to make the greatest strides in their ability and performances.

In these pages Ruben Guzman has supplied you with everything you need in order to do just that. The Swimming Drill Book is both an applicable training guide and a work of art.

The descriptions, stroke components, and progressions are clearly written. The excellent illustrations bring the instruction to life and offer a visual example of how the drill should be executed.

Coaches and swimmers of all levels will enjoy the clear presentation, simple approach, and rewarding improvement that this book is sure to provide anyone who uses it. As a former Olympian, I am proud that our country continues to develop great coaches, innovators, and authors like Ruben, who are leaders in the quest to advance competitive swimming performance.

Pablo Morales Five-time Olympic medalist University of Nebraska head swim coach xiv Preface In the past several years, since the writing of Swimming Drills for Every Stroke, there have been exciting new developments in understanding how the body can move more efciently and uidly through the water. Research also con- tinues to show that the most signicant factors in improved performance are technicalefciency of the strokes, starts, and turnsrather than physical conditioning.

The Swimming Drill Book incorporates those developments into a rened series of drills that have produced excellent results. In addition, the language of communicating these new concepts and skills to age-group and senior-level swimmers has been ne-tuned so that swimmers get it almost right away. The book begins with a chapter on body position and buoyancy. Most of these concepts were derived from Dr. Bill Boomer, the U. Olympic team swimming guru.

By simplifying the drills and developing a specic sequence of practicing the drills in daily workouts, swimmers have improved in ef- ciency from 25 to 40 percent. A chapter on breathing and kicking and one on sculling will prepare swim- mers for the chapters on each individual stroke.

A new concept in the book is that of the body angle while swimming backstroke and freestyle. By using the sciences of physics and kinesiology, I have tested stroke efciency to show that the optimal level of rotation is not 90 degreesa popular notionbut ap- proximately 45 degrees. The physics of the human body and its buoyancy are analogous to that of a sailboat, prompting the concept of the sailboat angle of rotation. From the kinesiological perspective, this is also consistent with maximum muscular power throughout the entire stroke cycle.

But improving in the pool isnt only about body position, breathing and kicking, and the strokes. Practicing starts, turns, and nishes also are important to the success of a swimmer, and the nal three chapters provide an array of drills for every type of start, turn, and nish.

Coaches and swimmers at all levels can use this book to increase practice effectiveness, improve competitive times, and enhance tness levels. Text to come! Because the water is foreign to humans, the technical aspects of moving through it become much more critical at the competitive level.

Most swimmers par- ticipating in the sport are relatively inexperienced in proper technique. For them, progress is most dramatic when their technique improves. But even for the most experienced swimmers, small technical improvements can make the difference between qualifying for nationals and not qualifying. This book covers the fundamentals needed for competitive swimming.

All of the essential drills are presented to assure that a swimmer is competent in the basics of competitive swimming. Mastering the basics provides the foun- dation for future development and renement.

Swimmers need to have a planned approach to developing good technique that is simple to learn, and successfully proven and tested. Swimmers who use this book will benet by learning effective ways to practice the skills of swimming. They will perform better and swim faster in competition. They are more likely to stay interested in swimming and will therefore enjoy the sport more. Coaches need to have a well-planned, comprehensive curriculum.

They also need a system that is exible and can be adapted to a variety of situa- tions. This book will benet coaches by providing an organized approach to stroke instruction. By using this system, they can communicate the course outline more effectively in advance, thereby gaining support from swimmers and parents. Once a coach becomes skilled in using these drills, he or she can easily detect and correct stroke deciencies, allowing the athletes to become faster and better swimmers.

Lets say you have sixteen weeks to prepare for a major competition. A good way to organize instruction is to divide drill training into three sections. Spend the rst nine weeks teaching the drills presented in this book in sequential or- der. Cover one chapter a week. Next, repeat the drills in chapters to polish and correct technique.

This lasts four weeks. To wrap up, spend three weeks focusing on starts, turns, and nishes chapters , along with brushing up any major stroke deciencies.

Once you have your overall week plan in place, organize each week like this: Day 1: Introduce the first two or three drills.

Day 2: Review drills learned on Day 1, and then introduce two or three new drills. Day 3: Review all previously learned drills. Next teach the final set of drills. Days 4 and 5: Review all key drills in sequence. Do your normal warm-up routine, but include at least one key drill learned the previous day. Once the entire system has been covered, a key drill from each stroke also becomes part of the warm-up.

Each week, change the key drill. Key drills should be memorized by your swimmers and performed weekly. To introduce and teach each drill, follow these steps: Provide a complete description of how the drill is performed. Show how the drill is performed by using the diagrams, or demonstrate the drill yourself. Have swimmers perform the drill after your initial explanation and demonstration. Point out what is done correctly. Next, focus on one point at a time. Correct any errors until the drill is done properly.

Once the swimmers perform the drill correctly, repeat it until the drill becomes a habit. Make sure the swimmers do not develop improper techniques. To coaches, your job is not an easy one and the rewards come all too slowly. I hope this material makes your job easier and more enjoyable. To swimmers, my hope is that you enjoy performing these drills. There is so much to learn about swimming. Just learn it a little at a time. I hope this book helps you master all of the important skills and helps you swim easier and faster.

To move through the water, we must learn to be relaxed and to have the water support our natural buoy- ancyour ability to oat.

Being able to position the body for maximum buoy- ancy with minimum effort is fundamental to swimming faster. These drills will enable you to feel how your body is positioned in the water, improve your ability to relax and have your body supported by the water, improve your ability to move through the water with less effort, and improve your efficiency in swimming all the strokes.

By learning how to relax and control body position, swimmers can improve their strokes almost instantly. While these drills may be simple to perform, they provide a transformational foundation for how swimmers experience their bodies in the water and for improvement in their performance.

In fact, even experienced swimmers become much more efcient by practicing these drills. Whether you are a beginner or an international-level swimmer, these drills are fundamental to your success. Procedure 1. Stand on deck with your back to a wall that is taller than you are.

Place your heels against the wall. Push your hips back against the wall as well. Tucking your chin in, place your shoulder blades back against the wall as well. Gently move your head back to the point where the back of your head is touching the wall as well. You should have four contact pointsheels, hips, shoulder blades, and head.

Take a small step away from the wall and try to maintain the same pos- ture. Step back against the wall to see whether you were successful. Focus Points You will likely feel different than when in your normal standing posture. Thats okay. Just feel how your body is lined up when the four contact points are touching the wall. Be sure to start with your heels and then move up to your hips, shoulder blades, and head.

Tips Practice standing or sitting with your ribs stretched upward. It will help you to maintain good posture in and out of the water. Perform the drill with a buddy who can correct you if you slouch. This is the first key drill in the buoyancy series.

Position yourself in the middle of a lane. Inhale deeply, and hold your breath.

Bend at the hips and knees so that you can grab around your ankles. Round your back, and tuck in your chin. Allow your body to naturally oat. Hold this position as long as you can until you need to exhale. Focus Points Be sure to inhale very deeply and hold your breath so you can float more easily. Keep the chin tucked in tightly. Feel which part of your back is floating highest at the surface. Tips Try to keep your back at the surface as you draw your legs in under- neath.

Stay in the middle of the lane to avoid running into the lane rope. This is the second key drill in the buoyancy series. As in the Cannonball Float, inhale deeply, and hold your breath.

Also, round your back and tuck your chin in. Unlike in the Cannonball Float, completely relax your arms and legs. They should be completely limp, like wet spaghetti noodles. Allow the body to naturally oat. Focus Points Be sure to inhale deeply and hold your breath so you can float more easily. Keep your chin tucked in tight. Let your elbows and knees bend naturally; stay relaxed.

Tips Have your coach check your arms and legs to make sure they are relaxed. If you are practicing this drill at home or on your own, be sure to tell some- one what you are doing so the person doesnt think you have drowned! This drill will set up the next drills in the buoyancy series.

Stand with your back against a wall. Place your heels, hips, and shoulder blades against the wall as in the Head and Body Position drill. Bring your chin down to allow your head to bend forward. With your arms out in front of you, place one hand directly over the other with your ngers together. It does not matter which hand goes on top. Wrap the thumb of the hand on top around the lower hand to lock your hands so that you cannot pull them apart.

Straighten your arms overhead so that your elbows are straight and your hands are against the wall. Bring the head back to cradle against your arms.

Now you are in a stream- line. Focus Points Be sure to hold your hands correctly: Reach up and back so that your elbows are completely straight. Your head should be in front of your arms. You should feel four contact points against the wall: Tips Have your coach work with you to make sure you can do this drill stand- ing away from the wall, and then in shallow water.

Practice standing in front of a mirror to check your streamline position. This exercise is by far the most difficult for many swimmers and may take extensive practice and body control to achieve.

Free Swimming Books for Improving Swimming Technique Including Bonus Exercises

This is the third key drill in the buoyancy series. Move into the Dead Swimmers Float position a. Gradually extend the arms into the streamline position b. Gradually extend the legs and point the toes c. Give your body time to rise up to the surface. Your goal is to have all four buoyancy points at the surface: Focus Points Be sure to keep your chin well tucked in.

Do not force the float or try to kick your way up. Let the water support your body. If your legs start to sink, tighten your back and hips. Tips Have your coach place a kickboard over your hips and heels so that you can feel when you have pushed them to the surface. Partner up with a buddy so that you can check each other. This is the fourth key drill in the buoyancy series. Position your body at the end of the lane, up against the wall and facing away from the wall.

Your hands hold on to the gutter and your feet are up, ready to push off. Push off from the wall at the surface in a streamline position. Slide as far down the lane as possible. Stop when your body has come to a complete stop to avoid running out of air. Focus Points Be sure to push off at the surface, not below it. Make sure your head is tucked in underneath your arms.

Keep your four buoyancy points at the surface: Point your toes as you move through the water. Try to stay in the middle of the lane. Tips In a group setting, combine swimmers from two lanes. Use one lane for sliding and the other lane for returning. On the way back, count the number of colored sections of the lane rope to measure your distance count the number of sections past the flags.

The farther you go, the better! The record for my team is all the way across a yard pool! This is the next key drill in the buoyancy series. Position your body at the end of the lane, facing the wall. Your hands hold on to the gutter and your feet are up, ready to push off a.

Push off from the wall at the surface in a streamline on your back b. Make sure your head is tucked in against your arms, with your face above the surface and your ears below the surface. Keep your main buoyancy point at the surface: On the way back, count the number of colored sections of the lane rope to measure your distance. This is an advanced buoyancy drill. While vertical, position your body in the middle of the lane.

Straighten your body, placing your hands at your sides a. Allow your body to naturally move down b and then up c. Tilt your head back as you come up so that you can quickly breathe. Continue to breathe and oat for at least 30 seconds.

Focus Points Be sure to take quick breaths. Point your toes. Try to keep your feet directly underneath you and stay in one place. Tip Position yourself over a particular spot in the pool and see if you can stay directly over it. This is an advanced buoyancy drill that follows the Pencil Float. Exhale steadily until you begin to feel your body sink b. Allow your body to sink to the bottom c. Push off with your feet to return to the surface, and repeat the drill. Focus Points Be sure to exhale smoothly.

Some swimmers may need to let out very little air to begin sinking; others may need to let out a lot of air. Tips Position yourself over a particular spot in the pool, and try to stay directly over it.

Partner up with a buddy. Notice how each of you is different in how quickly or slowly you sink. Yet these skills are often overlooked. Proper breathing and kicking are critical for swimmers to feel comfortable in the water, maintain good body position, and move through the water quickly and efciently.

Fast and efcient swimmers kick through the water with the body in a streamline, or stretched posi- tion, and breathe comfortably and relaxed holding the breath wastes energy.

The drills in this chapter will help you kick in a streamline position and learn proper breathing. Swimming with less drag and less friction saves en- ergy and time. Correct kicking and breathing mechanics can often lead to dramatic results.

The Swimming Drill Book

This chapter is the next layer in the foundation for excellent swimming technique. Breathing should flow in a relaxed manner; hold- ing the breath wastes energy. Facing the wall or standing in shallow water, hold on to the gutter with both hands. Position your feet against the wall or on the bottom a. Move your head up and down from just above the surface of the water to just below the surface b.

As soon as your mouth and nose go below the surface, breathe out and blow steady bubbles. Breathe in only when your mouth is above the surface. Breathe slowly, and stay relaxed. Repeat the motion at least 20 times in a row. Focus Point Do not continue to breathe out when you lift your head up. If someone can hear you breathing out or if you spray water out of your mouth, then you need to concentrate on breathing out only underwater and breathing in only above water.

Tip Place a lit candle real or imaginary in front of you above the surface. Dont blow out the candle! Sit on the edge of the deck. With your toes pointed and legs extended straight over the water, rst touch just your toes to the surface of the water. Then, lower your legs so that your feet are about 12 inches under the water. Keep your legs close together. Slowly raise one foot toward the surface, then lower it back 12 inches under the water while raising the other foot.

Continue alternately raising and lowering your feet, making sure the feet are close together as they pass each other. Keep the toes pointed toward the opposite end of the pool. Kick the water up toward the surface, but do not go above the surface.

Gradually increase the speed of the kick. As your speed increases, gradually bend your knees a little and relax the ankles.

Focus Points Keep your toes pointed toward the opposite end of the pool. Avoid point- ing the toes up to the sky. Boil the water, but do not splash. Kick under the water, not in the air. Tips Ask someone to stand in the water and hold his or her hand just under the water with his or her palm facing the pool floor. Kick the palm flat with the top of your foot. If your toes hit first, they need to be pointed more.

Practice leg raises. Holding on to a bar or the back of a chair, stand straight with one foot flat on the ground. Point the toes of the other foot, and touch the big toe to the ground.

Keeping your leg straight, lift it about 12 inches off the ground. Hold the position for 2 seconds. Slowly lower your leg and touch the big toe to the ground. Repeat 10 to 20 times. Switch legs. Vertical kicking is perhaps the quickest way to develop a powerful, efficient kick. Position yourself vertically in deep enough water that your toes cannot touch the bottom of the pool. Face the lane rope, and hold on to it with your arms extended. Begin to slowly utter kick, keeping your body at a vertical position with good posture a.

Your feet should only separate about 12 inches. Gradually kick a little harder so that your shoulders come above the surface b, c. Focus Points Keep your knees fairly straight. Maintain excellent posture. Many swimmers tend to push the hips back, so focus on keeping them straight and staying completely erect. Keep your feet moving quickly back and forth with smaller separation. Avoid bending your hips and knees and doing a bicycle kick.

Tips When you are able, try kicking in the vertical position with sculling see chapter 3. For an added challenge, bring your hands above the surface. For an extreme challenge, add a weight belt! Hold on to the gutter or wall, and place your feet on the wall at around hip depth a. Let go of the wall, and slowly push off using your legs. Straighten your body, and oat along the surface for about 5 seconds. Keep your arms at your sides.

Arch your back a little so that your abdo- men stays up along the surface. Feel how the bottom of your rib cage is up. Its okay if your legs sink a little b. Breathe comfortably, keeping your upper body on the surface. Focus Points Feel the bottom of your rib cage staying up at the surface. Be sure to keep your head back far enough that your ears are just under the water. Point your toes as you float. Tip Ask someone to place a half-board or noodle on your abdomen as you begin to float.

See how long you can keep it there. Begin with the foating position as in drill 13 Push and Float on Back , and gradually add a slow utter kick.

Kick just fast enough to keep the bottom of your rib cage at the surface a, b. Kick a lap. Stop before you get to the wall. Focus Points Kick as slowly as possible while maintaining correct body position. Stay relaxed! Keep your head back, and enjoy yourself. Tip Ask someone to place a half-board or noodle on your abdomen as you begin to kick.

Maintaining a good streamline will reduce friction and help you slice through the water with very little energy. Place one hand over the other with your ngers together. Wrap the thumb of the hand on top around the lower hand to lock your hands so that you cannot pull them apart a.

Straighten your arms overhead so that you cradle or brace your head between your arms. Your arms should be at least slightly behind your ears with the elbows completely locked b.

Push off the wall to a foating position as in drill 13 Push and Float on Back , but hold a streamline position. Gradually add a slow kick while keeping your abdomen up with the bottom of the rib cage as your focus point. Think in the following pattern: Focus Points Concentrate on each aspect in this order: Relax; dont force it.

Keep your toes pointed and your ankles relaxed. Kick slowly. Keep your head back. Keep your hands just under the water. Tips Using a kickboard or noodle as described in drill 13 Push and Float on Back works well here. Stand in front of a mirror to check your streamline position. There are three rules for an excellent streamline. Commit these rules to memory: Place one hand over the other. Lock the thumb. Brace the head. Starting at the wall, take a deep breath.

Push off from the wall with your eyes facing down, just the back of your head touching the surface. You should also feel your shoulders, hips, and heels at the surface.

Gradually add a slow utter kick. Kick just fast enough to keep your hips touching the surface. Kick as far as you can and slowly exhale until you need to breathe; then stop, breathe, and repeat. Feel your hips touching the surface at all times. Kick the water, not the air. If you can hear your kick, the feet are coming up too high.

Tips Have your coach or a partner place a half-board or noodle just above the hips to see if you can carry it forward. Imagine you are snorkeling and looking at all the fish at the bottom of the ocean! This position is frequently used in training sets. Push off the wall, and place your hands in a prone streamline position. Keep your hands, shoulders, hips, and heels at the surface. Slide for 2 seconds.

Then, begin kicking with a quick, steady utter kick. Keep your toes in the water at all times. The heels of your feet should just barely break the surface of the water. Your hips should be right at the surface a. Keep your head tucked in under your arms.

Slowly exhale to let your air out and go as far as you can, then stop. Breathe, and repeat b. Focus Points Keep your arms in the streamline position.

In other words, avoid lifting your feet above the surface of the water. While the splashing may look impressive, it does nothing but waste energy. Keep your hips up. Tips Try to position your head so that it is just barely breaking the surface or is slightly below the surface. It will help get you ready for the freestyle drills.

Sit on the edge of the deck with your legs extended over the water. Keep your heels just below the surface at all times during this exercise. Begin with your legs together and toes pointed, the inner sides of your feet touching a.

Bring the legs in toward your body fex at the knees and draw your thighs upward so that the knees are about shoulder-width apart, the heels are close together, and the toes point to the sides of the pool b.

Rotate your feet out to catch the water with the inner sides of the feet, keeping the knees about shoulder-width apart c. Begin to squeeze the water between your legs while keeping your feet fexed d. Bring your legs completely together, and nish with your toes pointed.

You should see and feel the powerful squeeze of the water. Focus Points Develop the following pattern: Be sure to finish each kick with the knees straight and the toes pointed. Catch as much water as possible on the sides of your feet when you squeeze your legs together. Tips You can practice this kick almost anywhere.

Try it while sitting down on the floor watching television. Or you can sit on your bed and practice it before you go to sleep. For an advanced version, begin in a leg lift position and do not let the feet touch.

This variation is great for the abdominals! This drill helps to prevent exaggerated hip action and improper leg mechanics.

Anyone with a weak breaststroke kick should emphasize this drill. Start by pushing off the wall to oat on your back into a streamline posi- tion along the surface a. Be sure to oat and keep your chest up! After counting to three one thousand one, one thousand two, one thou- sand three , begin and complete a breaststroke kick b.

Count to three between each repetition.

Focus Points Keep your upper-body position stable. Your head and chest should not go under the water. If they do, it usually means you are not keeping your feet up high enough.

Keep a tight streamline. Your hands should stay just below the surface. Finish each kick with the body in a floating position with the chest up and the toes pointed and near the surface. Do not allow your knees to rise more than 1 inch above the surface. Tip Move across the pool with as few kicks as possible. Make it a contest with a friend! Then begin kicking the breaststroke kick with a three-count hold in between a, b.

When you nish the kick, you should feel your hips up at the surface. The heels of your feet should just barely break the surface of the water c. Breathe, and repeat. Focus Points Keep your arms in a tight streamline with your head tucked in under- neath. Finish each kick with a tight squeeze and your toes pointed. Each time you keep your feet together for a count of three is called a slide. Youll need to remember this for later drills.

Keep your knees from drifting wider than shoulder-width apart. Tips Have someone watch to make sure you are squeezing the kick and keep- ing your hips up at the end of each kick. Move across the pool with as few kicks as possible.

Stand on the deck with your hands on your hips. Be sure to keep good back posture at all times during this exerciseavoid rounding the back and shoulders.

Always look forward. Begin by pushing your hips back and your chest forward while keeping your back and legs straight. The correct position will feel a little like starting to lean over to get a drink of water from a drinking fountain. Push your hips as far back as you can while still maintaining your bal- ance a.

Return your hips to a straight position. Push your hips forward, bending your knees slightly and keeping your back slightly arched b. Once again return to the straight position. Once you are comfortable with the motions, start to blend them in a smooth, continuous action.

Try to feel your hips moving through a full range of motion. Focus Points Be sure to keep your neck flexible so that you always look forward. Your chin should be tucked in when your hips are forward and should stick out when your hips are back.

Keep a slight arch in your low back at all times. At first, push the hips as far forward and back as possible. Then, speed it up and move your hips just a few inches forward and a few inches back. Tips Practice in front of a mirror at home so that you can see that you are always looking forward. Do this drill in shallow water about waist high , and really feel how the water moves. Put on fns. Imagine yourself as a mermaid or merman swimming along easily under the sea.

Take a deep breath.

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Then, push off the wall on your front side under the surface, keeping your hands down by your sides and looking down at the bottom of the pool. Do not use your arms at all on this drill. Use your head to start the body action a.

Push downward with the forehead to start the whiplike action of the kick. Keep the head angle changing, but primarily look down b, c.

Focus Points Do the surface dive very slowly. Really feel your body slide into the deeper water. Be sure to keep your head moving at all times. Look down at the black line on the bottom of the pool. If you are looking forward, your hips will not be able to create enough power for a strong kick. Tips Have someone watch you under the water to see that you are not looking forward.

Put on ns. Imagine yourself as a dolphin swimming at the surface on the ocean. This drill will have the same body action as the previous drill, except at the surface. Push off of the wall on your front side along the sur- face, keeping your hands down by your sides and looking down at the bottom of the pool a. Just the back of your head will break the surface. Do not use your arms on this drill. Use your head to start the body action.

Push downward with the forehead to start the whiplike action of the kick b. Keep the head angle changing, but primarily look down. As you push your forehead down, allow the hips to come up c. Then, allow your feet to slide above the surface, and begin to kick down d. Your head will begin to come back up to break the surface as you kick down. Break the surface with your head, and repeat.

Your body will stitch the surface of the water. Your head, then back, then hips, and then feet will all break the surface in progression with each kick.

Keep the motion uid. Go as far as you can with one breath, breathe, and then repeat. Focus Points Be sure to keep your head moving at all times.

Remember to move with your forehead first. Develop a steady rhythm. Tip Stay relaxed and see if you can make it all the way across the pool without having to stop and breathe. Push off the wall, and oat on your back with your arms down at your sides. Begin the dolphin kick by pushing your abdominals up a. Then, progres- sively push your knees, and then your feet, up to the surface, creating a whiplike action beginning with the abdominals b.

Your hands and head may go up and down a little; thats okay. Be sure to put one hand above your head to protect it as you approach the wall. Focus Points Be sure to push the abdominals up above the surface on each kick. Kick from the hips, not the knees, bending your knees just a little.

Tips Start off underwater, then gradually come to the surface. See if the kick feels the same. Do slow, big, powerful kicks at first.

Build speed later. Push off the wall, and oat on your back with your arms above your head in a streamline position a.

Begin the dolphin kick by pushing your abdominals, then knees, and nally your feet up to the surface b. Focus Points Be sure to push your abdominals up above the surface on each kick. Gradually build speed. As you get faster, the kicks will be shallower and quicker. First, imagine watching the dolphins like you would see at a marine park. Picture the dolphins as they kick up above the surface and seem to walk backward on the surface with their tails.

Their bodies move back and forth quickly and powerfully as they gradually move backward. You will now attempt to imitate this movement. Push off the wall on your back, with feet deep, arms down at your sides, and head above the surface. Use quick, strong dolphin kicks to keep your head and shoulders above the water as you gradually kick backward a.

This one is a challenge! You will really feel your abdomi- nals! Focus Points Feel the hips working back and forth as quickly and powerfully as pos- sible. Kick from the hips, not the knees, bending the knees just a little. Tips For an advanced version, keep your hands just above the surface at your sides b. To build great power, try the drill while wearing a weight belt. Sculling drills may be the best way of learning the propeller-like propulsion methods that swimming scientists have long con- sidered the most effective.

These drills are a practical way to practice pulling action, lifting action, and the finish of all strokes; learn about the pitch, lift, and angles of attackcreating whirlpools gives you direct feedback; improve your feel for the water; and strengthen your hands, forearms, and wrists. By modifying the bodys position and the direction of the sculling, swim- mers can feel how to apply pressure in the water and position their ngers, hands, wrists, and forearms for the most effective movement.

These drills offer a basic beginning to the art of sculling. This drill presents the basic sculling action. The drills that follow use this basic action in some fun and challenging positions. Stand in water about shoulder depth.

Start with one arm extended with the hand about 12 inches deep a. With your palm facing downward and your wrist strong, begin to trace a gure eight on its side. Sweep up and out, then sweep down and in b, c. This is the basic sculling action. Your hand should move across only about 12 to 18 inches.

These move- ments are short but strong. Keep the pressure on the palm of the hand. Use enough pressure to create a whirlpool at the surface. Switch hands, and repeat. Focus Points Quickly change the angle of your hand as you move it back and forth.

Keep your wrists strong. Rotate from the elbow. Feel the pressure on the hand and forearm. Tip Practice sculling with different hand shapes: Start with both arms extended in front of you about 12 inches deep. Next, using the same action as the previous drill, scull with the hands moving in opposite directions at the same time. Sweep out with both hands to a little wider than shoulder-width a , then sweep in with both hands b. Start slowly, and gradually move your hands more quickly to create two whirlpools.

Focus Points Quickly change the angle of the hands as you move them through the water. Feel the pressure on the hands and forearms. Tips Practice sculling with different hand shapes: Move to deep water and see if you can create the whirlpools at the surface while you flutter kick and stay in a vertical position.

Move to deep water, where your feet cannot touch the bottom. Practice the basic two-hand sculling action, and keep your feet together a, b. Be sure to keep your head up and your body straight. Create whirl- pools at the surface. Start by sculling just 20 seconds at a time, then try to gradually increase the amount of time to several minutes. Its a tough workout! Focus Points Move your hands quickly. Keep your body straight.

Keep your feet together. Keep your head up. Tips For variety, change your body position very slowly while keeping the hand action very fast. They also contain bonus swimming exercises to give you a taster of the type of easy-to-follow exercises that you will find throughout our full range of books. Each of these free e-books is delivered as a download link via the Swim Teach Facebook page and they are fully compatible with all smart phones and tablet devices capable of reading a pdf file.

Download time will vary depending on the type and quality of computer equipment and internet connection. The full versions of these books each contain individual drills showing a photograph of the exercise being performed, an illustration of the main parts, a list of technique tips and a list of coaching points for each exercise.

A Basic Guide To Front Crawl - This easy to read, concise 12 page book contains clearly labelled diagrams and graphics showing movement patterns and key focus points. To Download from Desktop or Browser, click here. To Download from Mobile or Tablet , click here. A Basic Guide To Breaststroke - An easy to follow and fully illustrated guide to breaststroke swimming technique.

A Basic Guide To Backstroke - This easy to read, concise book contains clearly labelled diagrams and graphics showing movement patterns and key focus points. A Basic Guide To Butterfly - An easy to follow and fully illustrated guide to butterfly stroke swimming technique. Each swim book takes the frustration out of learning to swim by making the technique simple and easy to understand.

AZZIE from North Dakota
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