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THE ONE MINUTE MANAGER BUILDS HIGH PERFORMING TEAMS PDF

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Newly updated and backed by decades of research, this classic guide will equip leaders and team members alike to unleash the power of teamwork. [Free] The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams New And Revised Edition [PDF]. [EPUB] Connect with APSC. The Australian. In The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams, the authors (Ken Blanchard, Donald Carew and Eunice Parisi-Carew) reveal the whole process of .


The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams Pdf

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Change Your Life! The One will also know how to apply them to your own situation remind each The One The One-Minute Cure: The Secret to Healing. cittadelmonte.info - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. One good management book. cittadelmonte.info - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online.

All rights reserved. Printed inthe United Statesof America. Nopart of this book maybeused or reproduced in any manner whatsoever without written permission except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical articles and reviews. HarperCollins books may be purchased for educational, business, or sales promotional use. For information please write: Work groups.

Team members begin to understand each other and feel comfortable working together to resolve differences. In turn, team members develop confidence in each other and s sense of cohesion develops. In this stage, disagreement is encouraged and the team works together to solve differences and begin to manage itself.

Encouraging disagreement can help prevent groupthink where the members are afraid of disagreement, leading to stagnation and a loss of innovation. The team is knowledgeable of its values, goals, responsibilities, and deliverables. There is no single best style of leadership. This is also referred to as situational leadership. It means that as a leader you start to view yourself as an educator as well as a leader.

Your job then becomes to empower your team members and give them opportunities to develop their skills and knowledge. This creates an environment where they can proactively take responsibility, be creative and feel free to take risks and make mistakes. As a leader, you must be multi-skilled. You must be an enabler of people and a facilitator of teams. Somewhat tentatively Bill spoke up again.

It's like in a new marriage when neither spouse wants to disagree even when they don't agree. Louise and the One Minute Manager joined him. Later after they work through some differences. The result can be a tendency toward Groupthink. Integration When the room emptied.

The danger to a team occurs when this euphoric feeling prevents a loss of productivity that comes from disagreement.

I noticed you opened the meeting. Irving Janis discovered that. You've helped me a lot. My role at this point is to encourage disagreement and to help the team work through the conflict.

I'm concerned about the team developing the confidence to manage disagreement and to value differences. I'd be there. If I continue to be in there directing. These are all important activities in the Integration Stage-the stage this group is in. My role at this stage is to support their efforts at self-management and to model effective membership.

The fourth stage is production. Productivity is high as team members have the knowledge. In between those two extremes are two stages: Morale is high. It looks something like this. On the other hand. The challenge at this stage is to maintain productivity and morale while managing closure. Here's where I want more information. Productivity and morale may increase or decrease as the end of the experience draws near. Team members feel sadness or loss-or.

Any other insights? How does a team leader know the very best way to work with a team during each stage? Notice how the productivity and morale dimensions change. Termination does occur in ad hoc teams or temporary task forces. With autocratic leadership the emphasis was on telling your people what to do. Team performance was paramount. Team morale was deemed to be the best way to maximize the group's performance. With democratic leadership the emphasis was on listening to your people.

That requires that you become a Situational Leader. There were two problems with these two extremes of leadership. If you were too autocratic. There is too much socializing. I've certainly seen that. When he finished labeling the boxes.

You're stifling creativity. One approach assumed that kids come to class with their barrels empty of knowledge and experience. When it came to applying these concepts to group leadership. People are confused about roles and goals and there is a high need for information. When applied to leadership situations. If that was the case. The reason a lot of support is not needed in this stage is that team members are already enthusiastic and committed. I used to be a school teacher when I first got out of college.

That's exactly what is needed when a team is in the orientation stage of development. Providing support is a "barrel drawing-out" activity. They didn't need a lot of direction because they had developed the skills necessary to function as a team and had resolved some of the issues of the Dissatisfaction Stage. Their barrels were empty. In our teaching analogy. The leader listens. Since they were dissatisfied.

They include recognition. Task functions include activities such as setting the agenda. The question is whether it has to be the designated group leader or not. Such activities focus on how the group is functioning. In the Dissatisfaction Stage. They are struggling with the task as well as how to work together so they need both direction and support Coaching-S2.

As a result. In the Integration Stage. And finally.

The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams

Would you mind if 1joined you and sat back while you share those ideas? Let's call her right now and set the time. I wanted some advice about how to convince you that what we were teaching was right. I think.

Dan pulled out a folder from his briefcase and began. He's been showing me how working in groups differs from managing one-on-one. I wanted to share with you what I've learned. To my surprise. Maria and the One Minute Manager met for lunch. After ordering their meal. I've been spending some time observing teams in action and talking with the One Minute Manager concerning his ideas about team development and leadership. In Sl the leader is primarily responsible for providing direction.

I need to determine which style fits the stage of the team's development. In S4 the team sets direction and makes decisions. I need to be clear about the team's goals and tasks. I need to determine the stage of development of the group in relation to that task. Do you think we could meet again in two weeks to discuss these ideas after I've had a chance to use them? I'd like to try some of your thoughts out and see how they work for me. The first was a quality task force that had just recently been convened and it was easy to diagnose that they were in the Orientation Stage.

The meeting went well and Maria felt good about the progress made. After you have tested the ideas. I'm glad you wrote that letter. Let's all get together the week after next. Maria decided to focus the group's energy on understanding goals.

They were not clear about goals and hadn't yet defined their individual roles or an action plan. Maria wasn't sure if her close connection with her group might be distorting her views.

Can a team move from Orientation to Production without the help of a team leader? As she reflected on her work in preparation for the meeting with Dan and the One Minute Manager.

It was harder for her to diagnose the stage this group was in. Once I determine a team's developmental stage and have decided on a leadership style. She couldn't decide whether they were in the Dissatisfaction or Integration Stage and so she had more difficulty in deciding what leadership style would work best. Can a manager's involvement with the unit get in the way of her ability to diagnose its stage of development?

They seemed to like. Dan and the One Minute Manager got together. I think we could work better with a flipchart and room to spread out our work.

One of the units in my plant has been functioning beautifully for six months.

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Maria immediately spoke up. It didn't seem like the same team I'd met with last month so my question is: If so. I've written my questions down on this sheet of paper. When that does occur. In many groups today matching starts at the first meeting when they do not have a former leader. My primary job is to continue to change my style whenever possible to help the group move through the stages to Stage 4 and sometimes Stage 5. Matching involves gradually turning over the responsibility for direction and support to the team.

I can illustrate this best by referring back to the four basic Situational Leadership II styles. So matching involves managing the journey from dependence on a leader or some outside sponsor to interdependence. And that really made the group more angry and more unhappy. In other words. I would get angry and move straight from a supporting Style 3 to a directing Style 1. That also means that your leadership style has to follow this same track-you can't skip a style.

No matter how sophisticated team members are about the task or how experienced they are in group dynamics. If you want to get from Style 1 to Style 4. But if you assume a team is further along than it is and you start off too participative and supportive and you have to back up and be more directive. Human Relations and wanted to be the kids' friend right away and they did not perform.

If she started off as Ms. People begin to feel empowered when their ideas are valued. If a leader stays in a highly directive style for long. It's a start-up style and should be used to build the Team Charter.

Stating those goals is often a good way to move to a resolving style and to encourage input from team members. The team is struggling during the Dissatisfaction Stage for a sense of purpose and independence.

It sounds like something to avoid if possible. As people begin to express their opinions and state their needs. It's a time of turbulence. Appropriate leadership behavior at the right time can certainly reduce the amount of dissatisfaction. The reality of the hard work sets in after the honeymoon is over. Morale is declining and so we need to find ways to catch the team doing things right as well as to continue to help build skills and knowledge.

The team needs to learn how to manage their communication and decision making. As I mentioned to Dan. The team has to go through this awkward period before it can move to adulthood and the Production Stage.

It needs to develop ground rules for listening and managing conflict and encouraging everyone's input. I have found that just knowing that this stage is inevitable helps me keep my commitment to persevere and to progress to the next stage.

Don't forget. This by itself is a supportive behavior. In fact: Team responsibility for both the task and the process is increasing and consequently the team should become less dependent on the formal leader.

You don't just jump from a directing to a delegating style. I know that the most devastating situations in my career are those times when I have no say in important decisions that affect me at work.

The team with the leader as a member is now a self-directed team. When that happens the leader is no longer making decisions for the team. Then you determine whether you need to move back to Coaching Style 2 and either redirect or reprimand to get the group back to proper functioning. That would be the ultimate derailment.

You have to back track to Supporting Style 3 and try to find out what's going wrong. You can expect it. Can a manager get so involved that he or she can't decide what stage a group is in? I'm particularly interested in that question because it involves the team leader's role of participant observer.

Let's go to Maria's last question. While that member is playing that role. Someone else will then step out and assume the role. I was just a process observer. Being fully aware of our own behavior helps move the group through its developmental stages. Nothing fit neatly. Energy was very high and tension was obvious. However questions were about roles and goals and strategies which 1 thought were orientation needs.

All group members monitored their own interactions and we made great strides toward resolution. Who talks? Who talks to whom?

Who follows whom? At the end of the hour she reported back. A strategy such as that promotes both awareness and mutual responsibility to monitor group functioning.

Much to our dismay she counted forty times in that one hour when we interrupted one another. Group members need to assume the responsibility of their own monitoring or they will never become a high performing team. It could be just the stimulation the group needs. Sometimes a third. It can be very helpful to the group. Your job as a one minute manager is to empower them.

In those cases the process observer acts as an objective candid camera which removes any question of vested interest. Then he spoke. One day I was complaining about how overloaded I felt.

Seeing this. Your job is to educate your people. He listened patiently while I ranted and raved and then said simply. A pensive look came over his face. I was responsible for all that went on in my department and couldn't keep up. In every group there is a well of creativity and talent. Your job is to help all team members develop the skills and knowledge so they become self-directed and to provide an environment where they feel willing to risk.

You can't depend on seminars or training sessions to do that for you. Unless you do this. Your primary job is to develop your people. If you believe groups can be high performing and you help them develop the appropriate skills and knowledge and the freedom to act. That will make your life a whole lot easier.

It's a self-fulfilling prophecy. As a leader you are a teacher. I have a board meeting in half an hour so I'll need to move along. If I can be of further assistance.

Both of you have been so helpful. I'm going to use my own work unit as a focus for these concepts. Good luck. It's been a pleasure meeting with you. I don't mean just with each other. They will set stretching goals. When they know that. Even critical feedback will be accepted if teams see it as part of their developmental process and if it is focused on helping them win. He taught the managers in the program that the steps to empowering others begin with diagnosis.

Dan integrated the concepts in the Essentials of Management course he was teaching. Once the stage of development is determined. Dan told the managers. Once specific needs have been determined Dan advised the managers to develop a specific action plan for managing the journey to team empowerment. And then. In determining the stage of development he suggested that they might use the characteristics.

Dan created a pocket-size "Game Plan" to make it easier for the managers he taught to become effective team leaders. Deliver the Appropriate Leadership Style Then: Begin to manage the journey to group empowerment.

I wanted everyone to know the stages of group development so that the burden for helping the group move from one stage to the next did not all lie with me. She learned that when you want to empower people it is exhausting to get them ready to share responsibility. It took time. They enjoyed comparing their learnings with each other. Being a good team leader was much harder than being an autocratic leader. Noone is concerned if I am late or miss a meeting.

Maria smiled. But the one thing that is even more important than having my work unit involved in diagnosis. They can assume leadership and 1 feel a new freedom and trust. They made comments like: Paul Hersey for his creative work with Ken Blanchard in the development of Situational Leadership theory. National Training Labs Institute for its pioneering work in group dynamics and group development and for the significant impact that organization has had on all of our lives.

Ken Benne and Paul Sheats for their pioneering work on functional roles of group members. Marshall Sashkin for his courageous argument about participation as an ethical imperative.

Lacoursiere for his thorough analysis of the life cycle of groups. Edgar Schein for his clear thinking about process consultation and group observation. Praisings We would like to give credit to the following people whose conceptual contributions were invaluable to us in preparing this book. Irving Janis for his development and documentation of the Groupthink concept. The many participants in High Performing Team seminars and management development programs who reviewed earlier drafts of the manuscript and suggested several important changes.

Blanchard Consulting Partners and University of Massachusetts doctoral students too numerous to mention individually for their challenging and constructive feedback and suggestions. Ken is the chief spiritual officer of The Ken Blanchard Companies. Humberto Medina. Ken and his wife. Raving Fans. Don Carew is an accomplished and respected management consultant. About the Authors Few people have made a more positive and lasting impact on the day-to-day management of people and companies than Ken Blanchard.

He is also cofounder of the Lead Like Jesus Ministries. He has consulted with governmental. He is the author of several bestselling books.

He is cocreator of the High Performing Teams product line offered by The Ken Blanchard Companies and has authored a multitude of articles for professional journals. Eunice Parisi-Carew is an accomplished management consultant and trainer and a sought- after motivational speaker. He is also an active associate of the NTL Institute.

He is a professor emeritus at the University of Massachusetts. He is often regarded as genuine and caring and relates well to any audience regardless of the diversity of its members.

With a broad base of experience in many facets of management and organizational development. He holds a bachelor's degree in business from Ohio University. He is a founding consulting partner with The Ken Blanchard Companies. Asthey filedout the door, the members expressed pleasure that Dan had been abletojoin them.

Dan was impressed. He had never been to a meeting where so much had been accomplished so smoothly and with such a positive attitude. It was as though the teamacted as one unit and not a number of individuals.

He couldn't help thinking of the analogy of awell-oiled machine where all parts were functioning inperfect harmony to produce adesired outcome. Histhoughts were interrupted asNeil approached.

We've been working together for two years. They really don't need me here anymore. Production Dan's eyes widened. We've had our rough times. My goal has been to work myself out of a job gradually as the team developed and I'd say we're there, wouldn't you? You have to change your leadership depending onthe stage of development the group is inandthe goal istoget the group tothe point where they are not only accomplishing the task efficiently but operating effectively as ateam.

He should be free shortly," smiled Dana, the One Minute Manager's executive assistant. As he waited, Dan reflected on his experiences over the past fewdays andjotted down some notes: Members on the performance appraisal committee were enthusiastic, yet concerned about how they fit in. They were in Stage 1: They had little knowledge of the task.

Ron Tilman provided alot of direction to clarify the purpose and values, set roles and goals and define tasks. There was little two-way interaction except at the end when he asked how people were feeling and if they understood the time Hnesand next steps. Susan Schaefer's productivity team members were confused and disgruntled.

They were inStage 2: They were making headway but it was slow. Sue was very assertive in the management of the group, but she also encouraged people to express their thoughts and opinions. The shipping department was operating so smoothly and with such efficiency that the absence of Neil, the department head, seemed to have little impact. He said they were in the production stage. The team was enthusiastic and highly productive. Neil's contributions were no different from any other member's, but how did that group get there?

Dan pondered this question. Instinctively, he knew there was apiece missing. A team could not just move from a disgruntled group of individuals into such asynergistic, productive unit.

Production Ashethought, the OneMinuteManager appeared. The teamleader was careful to layout all the groundwork and provide direction. The next group I observed was moving slowly, accomplishing the task, but seemed to be very fragmented. More like the meetings I'm used to. Susan did not appear disturbed by this. She provided a lot of direction, both in terms of tasks and getting people to work together, and she listened patiently and encouraged people. They were in the production stage.

They seemed to have it all together. They were enjoying each other and the work and the group was managing itself. My question is: How did they get there? Did I miss something?

Youwent straight fromdissatisfaction toproduction. Before I talk about the missing stage, let me give you a summary card for Stage 4: It's the bridge between the dissatisfaction you witnessed in Susan's team and the efficiency and excitement in Neil's.

This stage is often fairly brief," thought the One Minute Manager. Suddenly the intercom on the One Minute Manager's desk came alive. Should I have her call later? What can I do you for? As I've said, you have to trust the process. It works. By the way, how would you feel about a visitor in your meeting tomorrow morning?

The One Minute Manager Builds High Performing Teams – Actionable Books

He is afriend of mine who is interested in how groups develop and it sounds like your meeting would fill a missing gap. Hewill be there. Tomorrow you will attend astrategic planning meeting that Louise is running-that is, if you'd care to. The next morning Dan arrived early at the office. Hehad spent the cab ride thinking of howfortunate he was to have met such a special person who seemed to get real pleasure in sharing information with others.

Information is power and the One Minute Manager gave it freely. Louise Gilmore, the vice president of strategic planning, was sitting quietly at her desk when Dan arrived. She seemed to come cilivewhen he walked inand with abig smile and firmhandshake greeted him warmly. Dan was struck by her vitality and friendliness. Together they entered the meeting room where the six group members were chatting and joking amicably. Louise introduced Dan as he found a seat. All team members greeted him cordially but with abit of reserve.

Dan couldn't help feeling that his presence made them abit uncomfortable. Integration The meeting began with Louise reviewing the struggle the team had had in determining next year's direction and goals and then the outcomes they had finally agreed upon. There was much joking and laughing during the review and friendly kidding of one another. It seemed that they enjoyed and valued each other's company in spite of or because of the prior disagreements Louise had mentioned.

Louise laughed along with them. Today's agenda began with new decisions to be made. The group engaged immediately, listening to one another, building on each other's ideas and often agreeing readily. Dan watched in fascination at how smoothly things were proceeding. After opening the meeting, Louise gave control of the meeting to other members as the topics of discussion changed.

There was an air of respect and politeness inthe group. Dan noticed some members became less vocal as time went on. Much to his surprise, just as Dan assumed a decision was made, Louise spoke up. Are you having some reservations? At first the others protested and then the group began a heated discussion of the pros and cons of the new points Bill had made. Dan thought to himself, "Uh, oh, she's lost it. The team had been working well before this.

Others began to do likewise. Somewhat tentatively Bill spoke up again. Bill then asked if there was aconsensus on the decision.

All team members responded enthusiastically. Shortly after, the meeting adjourned. There was afeeling of accomplishment and eagerness in the air.

The team members sauntered out, each stopping to shake hands with Dan. Team members seemed to feel confident and productive. Dan heard comments like: Also, I noticed you opened the meeting, then let them manage it, but youjumped back inand helped them out as necessary.

It's likeinanew marriage when neither spouse wants to disagree even when they don't agree. Later after they work through some differences, their marriage can be stronger. The danger to ateam occurs when this euphoric feeling prevents a loss of productivity that comes from disagreement. The result can be atendency toward Groupthink. Irving J anis discovered that, often, social pressure prevented members from disagreeing.

My role at this point is to encourage disagreement and to help the team work through the conflict. I'm concerned about the team developing the confidence to manage disagreement and to value differences. These are all important activities in the Integration Stage-the stage this group is in.

If I continue tobe inthere directing, however, that would never happen.

My role at this stage is to support their efforts at self-management and to model effective membership. You've helped me alot. Morale is high, though, as everyone is excited about being part of the team and has high expectations. The fourth stage is production, where the team is humming. Productivity is high as team members have the knowledge, skills and morale to be a high-performing team.

In between those two extremes are two stages: On the other hand, morale or enthusiasm started high in orientation and then took a dip in dissatisfaction, but then it began to increase again inintegration and production.

It looks something like this," he said as he drew the chart onthe flipchart. Noticehowtheproductivity andmoraledimensions change," saidthe One Minute Manager. Termination does occur in ad hoc teams or temporary task forces, so team members need to be prepared for its outcomes. Productivity and morale may increase or decrease as the end of the experience draws near.

Team members feel sadness or loss-or, on the other hand, a rush to meet deadlines. The challenge at this stage is to maintain productivity and moralewhile managing closure. Any other insights? Here's where I want more information. Howdoes ateam leader know the verybest waytoworkwith ateamduring each stage? With autocratic leadership the emphasis was on telling your people what to do, howto do it, where to do it, and when to do it.

Team performance was paramount. With democratic leadership the emphasis was on listening to your people, praising their efforts and facilitating their interactions with each other. Team morale was deemed to be the best way to maximize the group's performance.

There were two problems with these two extremes of leadership. If you were too autocratic, people would complain after awhile and say: You're stifling creativity,' and, 'You're controlling everything.

There is too much socializing, or meetings are taking too long. I'vecertainly seen that. When he finished labeling the boxes, he handed it to Dan: When applied to leadership situations, the four styles are called directing 51 , coaching 52 , supporting 53 and delegating When it came to applying these concepts to group leadership, as we're doing here, itwas felt that those labels needed to be modified to more directly reflect what groups needed at each stage of the teamdevelopment.

I used to be aschool teacher when I first got out of college," continued the One Minute Manager. One approach assumed that kids come to class with their barrels empty of knowledge and experience. If that was the case, what would be the job of the teacher?

That's exactly what is needed when ateam is inthe orientation stage of development. People are confused about roles and goals and there is ahigh need for information, skills and structure.

The reason alot of support is not needed inthis stage is that team members are already enthusiastic and committed. Their barrels were empty. In our teaching analogy, the second approach assumed that students bring to class a'full barrel' of knowledge and experience but it is not particularly organized. Therefore, it's the job of the teacher todrawthat knowledge andexperience out of the kids and then help them organize it.

Providing support is a"barrel drawing-out" activity. The leader listens, supports, and facilitates the team's interactions inacollaborating style.

They didn't need alot of direction because they had developed the skills necessary to function as a team and had resolved some of the issues of the Dissatisfaction Stage.

Since they were dissatisfied, morale was dropping and they needed to express their opinions and they needed support fromher. The question iswhether it has to be the designated group leader or not.

Task functions include activities such as setting the agenda, establishing goals, giving direction, initiating discussion, setting time limits, giving and seeking information and summarizing. Such activities focus on how the group is functioning. They include recognition, listening, encouraging participation, conflict management and relationship building.

Infact, as team members are able to take over these functions, it is best for the manager to move out of those roles. In the Dissatisfaction Stage, team members are not high on either competence or commitment.

They are struggling with the task aswell as how to work together so they need both direction and support Coaching-S2. In the Integration Stage, team members have the skills to perform well but still need to build their confidence or morale so they need support and encouragement Supporting-S3.

And finally, when a team reaches the Production Stage they have high skills and morale so the leader can stand aside or join in and let them work with minimal interference Delegating-S4.

As a result, the burden for both often falls onthe leader. In the Integration Stage, the team is managing the task concerns but needs help on team maintenance. Then, finally, inthe Production Stage both task and maintenance functions are being attended to by team members.

Would you mind if 1joined you and sat back while you share those ideas? Let's call her right now and set the time. After ordering their meal, Dan pulled out a folder from his briefcase and began. I wanted some adviceabout howto convince you that what we were teaching was right.

To my surprise, he agreed with your comments about the importance of working in groups. He's been showing me how working in groups differs from managing one-on-one. I've been spending some time observing teams inaction and talking with the One Minute Manager concerning his ideas about team development and leadership.

I wanted to share with you what I've learned, so I put this Situational Leadership II diagram together that, I think, summarizes how aleader can best work with and develop agroup into ahigh performing team. First, I need to be clear about the team's goals and tasks.

Second, I need to determine the stage of development of the group inrelation to that task. InSl the leader is primarily responsible for providing direction. In S4the team sets direction and makes decisions. I'dliketotry some of your thoughts out and see how they work for me. Do you think we could meet again intwo weeks to discuss these ideas after I've had a chance to use them?

After you have tested the ideas, you may have some additional thoughts and questions. Let's all get together the week after next, same time, same place. The first was aquality task force that had just recently been convened and it was easy to diagnose that they were in the Orientation Stage. They were not clear about goals and hadn't yet defined their individual roles or an action plan.

Maria decided to focus the group's energy on understanding goals, establishing roles and defining the skills needed and the necessary first steps. The meeting went well and Maria felt good about the progress made. It was harder for her to diagnose the stage this group was in. They seemed tolike, enjoy and support each other, but there was an underlying uneasiness and some tension between some of the members of the group.

She couldn't decide whether they were in the Dissatisfaction or Integration Stage and so she had more difficulty in deciding what leadership style would work best. Maria wasn't sure if her close connection withher group might be distorting her views. As she reflected on her work in preparation for the meeting with Dan and the One Minute Manager, shejotted down several questions inher notebook: Can ateam move fromOrientation to Production without the help of ateam leader?

Once I determine ateam's developmental stage and have decided on aleadership style, how long should I stay with that leadership style? Can amanager's involvement with the unit get inthe way of her ability to diagnose its stage of development?

I've written my questions down onthis sheet of paper. One of the units in my plant has been functioning beautifully for six months, but last week when I was there they seemed to be very tentative in their behavior, reluctant to speak out, and I felt some unspoken tension.

It didn't seem like the same team I'd met with last month so my question is: If so, why, and what can be done to prevent it? I think wecould work better with aflipchart and room to spread out our work. My primary job is to continue to change my style whenever possible to help the group move through the stages to Stage4and sometimes Stage 5, where they will be ahigh performance team. Matching involves gradually turning over the responsibility for direction and support to the team.

In many groups today matching starts at the first meeting when they do not have a former leader. When that does occur, the organization has to provide the group with help during the chartering process so the group can stay on a course that is helpful to the organization. So matching involves managing the journey from dependence onaleader or some outside sponsor to interdependence, from external control to internal control.

I can illustrate this best by referring back to the four basic Situational Leadership II styles. If you want to get from Style 1to Style 4, what two stations do you have to stop at along the way? In other words, you couldn't go right from Orientation to Production. No matter how sophisticated team members are about the task or how experienced they are ingroup dynamics, they still have to create a team and the process of developing a high performing team requires going through those states.

That also means that your leadership style has to follow this same track-you can't skip a style. Then, not knowing what I was doing, I would get angry and move straight from a supporting Style 3 to a directing Style 1. And that really made the group more angry and more unhappy.

But if you assume ateamisfurther alongthan itisandyoustart off too participative and supportive and you have to back up and be more directive, members will resent it, even if it is appropriate. If she started off as Ms.

Almost Finished...

Human Relations and wanted to be the kids' friend right away and they didnot perform, itwould be murder to retain control. It's astart-up style and should be used to build the TeamCharter, share necessary information, explain initial goals and tasks and help the teamdevelop the skillsnecessary tobecome more effective.

If aleader stays in a highly directive style for long, however, teammembers will soon feel resentment about being told over and over what to do and howto do it They will be less inclined to contribute their ideas and opinions.

Productivity, satisfaction and creativity will all suffer as aresult. People begin to feel empowered when their ideas are valued. R emember, agroup can have process goals such as open communication and shared leadership as well as task goals. Stating those goals is often a good way to move to a resolving style and to encourage input fromteam members.

Appropriateleadership behavior attheright timecancertainlyreducetheamount of dissatisfaction, but it will never eliminate it. As people begin to express their opinions and state their needs, differences will emerge. As a result, some members get competitivewith one another and engage in power struggles, others withdraw andstill others get discouragedandfrustratedwith the difficultyof the task.

The reality of the hard worksets inafterthehoneymoonisover. Theteam is struggling duringthe DissatisfactionStagefor a sense of purpose and independence. It's atime of turbulence. It sounds like something to avoid if possible," saidMaria. As I mentioned to Dan, it is the adolescent stage in a team's life. The team has to go through this awkward period before it can move to adulthood and the Production Stage. Unfortunately, lots of groups get stuck inthis stage and that's what leads to the negative feelings about groups that is so common.

I have found that just knowing that this stage is inevitable helps me keep my commitment to persevere and to progress to the next stage. Morale is declining and so we need to find ways to catch the team doing things right as well as to continue to help build skills and knowledge. The team needs to learn how to manage their communication and decision making. It needs to develop ground rules for listening and managing conflict and encouraging everyone's input.

Remember, we need to try to provide the kind of behavior that the team is not able to provide for itself. Youdon't just jump froma directing to a delegating style. Don'tforget, inaddition toincreasingsupport andreducingdirectionyou're also increasing team involvement in the decision making process. This by itself is a supportive behavior, an empowering behavior.

Team responsibilityfor both the task and the process is increasing and consequently the team should becomeless dependent ontheformal leader.

I know that the most devastating situations in my career are those times when I have no say in important decisions that affect me at work. When that happens the leader is no longer making decisions for the team, but rather participating in these decisions. The team with the leader as a member is now aself-directed team. Remember, a high performing team is more creative and better at problem solving than any individual functioning alone.

You can expect it.

DELFINA from Ohio
I do love sympathetically. Review my other articles. One of my extra-curricular activities is modern pentathlon.